Queensland Theatre Company QTC Who's Who QTC Hall of Fame Golden Years 1970's & 1980s

QTC Hall of Fame and QTC Who’s Who

Each in their own unique way, these pioneering shepherds contributed building the success and global reputation of the Queensland Theatre Company during its “golden age” from inception up until the late 1980’s. I believe many should be permanently recognized in a QTC Hall of Fame. Also view my In Memoriam tribute. It’s all a work in progress.

Queensland Theatre Company
GOLDEN YEARS HALL OF FAME

Judith Anderson Victor Ashelford Paul Atthow Bruce Auld Don Batchelor Chris Betts Pat Bishop Sheila Bradley Mike Bridges Bille Brown AM Noeline Brown OAM Carol Burns Gary Cameron Reginald Cameron OAM Geoff Cartwright Diane Cilento David Clendinning Gillian Coar Dr Peter Cooke AM June Craw OAM Karen Crone Elaine Cusick Paul Dellit OAM Grant Dodwell Carmen Duncan Alan Edwards AM MBE Lindsay Fairman Noel Ferrier AM Rodney Fisher AM Margery Forde Richard Fotheringham AM Murray Foy Arthur Frame AM Frank Gallacher Gregory Gesch Reginald Gillam Eugene Gilfedder Stephen Haddan Ron Haddrick AM MBE Douglas Hedge Jamie Henson Kevin Hides Libby Higgin Laurence Hodge Hazel Howson Ivar Kants Ellen Kennedy Ken Kennett OAM Lloyd King Robert Kingham Peter Kowitz John Krummel OAM Toni Lamond AM Alan Lawrence Mark Lee Diane Leith Nigel Levings Robin Lovejoy OBE Joe MacColum Gayle MacGregor Graham Maclean Anthony McGill Andrew McFarlane Scott McGregor Sally McKenzie Keith Michell Aubrey Mellor OAM Warren Mitchell Hugh Munro Phil Moye Sir David Muir, CMG Dale Murison David Napier Dr Bryan Nason AM Lloyd Nickson Peter Noble Paul Parkinson Hazel Phillips OAM Gaye Poole Lynne Porteous Robin Ramsay Kristin Reuter Kate Richter W.R.J. Riddel AM OBE James Ridewood Mick Rodger Betty Ross OAM Geoffrey Rush AC June Salter AM Lewis Savage Jenny Seedsman Tony Sheldon Cliff Simcox Toby Simkin Brian Stacey Howard Steele Babette Stephens AM MBE Kaye Stevenson Darien Sticklen Steven Tandy Frank Thring Lyn Treadgold Geraldine Turner OAM Duncan Wass David Walters David Waters John Watson Gwen Wheeler Stephen Whittaker David Williamson AO Kate Wilson Leo Wockner Magda Wollner

Hundreds contributed to the early success of the company (allowing it to achieve Royal status in the first 15 years) and while the contribution of some stand out as worthy of special mention, none of it would have been possible without the contributions made by each member of the company in it’s first 2 decades…

QTC Whos Who Judith AndersonJudith Anderson

(aka Isabelle Anderson since 1983)
Actor and Choreographer

Isabelle Anderson is an active Director, Actress and Mask Designer.  Now based in the USA, she is the Distinguished Artist in Residence for Baltimore’s Chesapeake Shakespeare Company where she has directed and performed in multiple productions. In Australia, for Sydney, Melbourne, and Queensland state Theatre Companies, A Streetcar Named Desire, Macbeth, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Nicholas Nickelby, A Midsummer Nights Dream, The Pillars of Society, Heartbreak House, Mother Courage, Pericles, Top Girls, Stepping Out, Troilus and Cressida, and The Playboy of the Western World. One-woman show: New Sky at Nimrod Theater, Sydney, and tour. Film: Careful He Might Hear You, Undercover, The Winds of Jarrah, Rebel. For Twentieth Century Fox, Great Expectations. TV credits include in Australia: Scales of Justice, A Country Practice, Five Mile Creek, The Dismissal. and on French TV: Le Bord des Larmes. Jeune Theatre National: Si Jamais Je Te Pince. She has been a teacher with NIDA (National Institute of Dramatic Art, Australia); Columbia University (School For the Arts); New York University (Experimental Theatre Wing); Blue Man Group; Academy for Classical Acting at The Shakespeare Theater in conjunction with George Washington University.

Selected highlights of credits include: New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] President Wilson in Paris (La Boite) [22 May 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973]

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QTC Whos Who Victor AshelfordVictor Ashelford

Stage Management & Lighting Designer & Actor

After graduating from the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) Victor worker in Stage Management and Lighting Design for wide variety of Theatre, Opera and Ballet companies in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth. He also managed outdoor events including New Years Eve for the Festival of Sydney from 1980/4 and spent time working in the Drama Departments of both The University of New England (UNE) and The University of NSW (UNSW). In 1988 Victor managed the audiovisual installation for “First State 88” The opening exhibition in SCEC Darling Harbour and moved into corporate staging firstly with Intercity and later Haycom Staging. In 1990 Victor founded ThirdBase Design and Technical Services a boutique special events consultancy specialising in product launches, conferences and exhibitions for both Australian and multinational corporations throughout Australia and as far afield as Asia, Europe and North & South America. for major national and multinational corporations. Since 2004 Victor has also lectured in Staging and Special Event Management at the International College of Management Sydney New South Wales TAFE and Torrens University.

Selected highlights of credits include: Deathtrap (Tour 1980) Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979]

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QTC Whos Who Paul AtthowPaul Atthow

in memoriam

Choreographer, Actor & Stage Management

The larger-than-life theatre personality was known for his love of teaching and dance and his passion when it came to putting the two together. Paul was one of the most immediately likeable and energetic people you would ever meet. He died in April 2007, aged 63 after a suspected heart attack.

Selected highlights of credits include: A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical, (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] The Parker Pen (Edward St) [8 May 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Bruce AuldBruce Auld

in memoriam

Designer

Bruce was a beloved Resident Designer with the Royal Queensland Theatre Company. Bruce graduated from the NIDA design course in 1984.  His freelance work included productions for Theatre South, the State Theatre Company of South Australia, Canberra Theatre Centre and others.  He designed a series of operas for the NSW Conservatorium and youth operas.  Bruce sadly passed away in Sydney in 1994.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Man From Mukinupin (Suncorp) [16 November 1989] The Taming of the Shrew (Suncorp) [17 August 1989] Kaspajack, (Cremorne) [27 July 1989] Major Barbara (Suncorp) [23 May 1989] Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] The Recruiting Officer (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [4 October 1988] Night and Day (Suncorp) [19 July 1988] A Different Drummer (Suncorp) [12 April 1988] Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Suncorp) [8 March 1988] Count Dracula (Suncorp) [24 November 1987] Hard Times, (Cremorne) [10 November 1987] The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] God’s Best Country (Suncorp) [8 September 1987] Away, (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987]

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QTC Whos Who Don BatchelorDon Batchelor

in memoriam

(aka Donald Batchelor)
Director, Actor & Production Manager

Don Batchelor was production manager of ‘The College Players’, a touring theatre company founded in the late ‘50s by Bryan Nason, former manager of the SGIO Theatre, and an actor, director, playwright, writer of lyrics and reviewer for Theatre Australia. Don lectured in Theatre Studies at Queensland University of Technology for many years.

Selected highlights of credits include: Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986]  Then and Now (TIE Tour) [22 May 1978]  Dreamtime & Dionysus (Tour) [1978]  The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds (SGIO) [1 November 1973]  White with Wire Wheels (La Boite) [4 June 1973]  A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]  The Royal Hunt of the Sun (SGIO) [1 October 1969]

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QTC Whos Who Chris BettsChris Betts

Actor & Fight Director

Chris started with the Q.T.C. in 1982 working in the Roadwork theatre and education division touring through Queensland, and was on stage in over 300 performances that year. His first major role was as Galileo in Brecht’s The Life of Galileo. He was the understudy and went on without having had an opportunity to rehearse the role, as he was also playing Ludovico in the play. Apart from his work at Q.T.C. He has also worked with most of the other State Theatre companies.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] Count Dracula (Suncorp) [24 November 1987] God’s Best Country (Suncorp) [8 September 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Pat BishopPat Bishop

in memoriam

Actor

Patricia Mary Bishop was born on June 13, 1946 in Belfast, Northern Ireland, noted for her performances in theatre, film and TV. She was married to  actor Bill Hunter in 1976 however the marriage was short-lived after Hunter ran off with their marriage celebrant. She received an AACTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her representation of Jenny in the 1976 film Don’s Party, Brides of Christ (1991) and The Paper Man (1990). Bishop also appeared frequently on TV, with credits including: Contrabandits, The Link Men, Homicide, Division 4, Matlock Police, Spyforce, Number 96, A Country Practice, Brides of Christ, Water Rats, Blue Heelers, A Step in the Right Direction and All Saints. She is probably best known for her role in Prisoner as gangster’s wife Antonia McNally in 1979. She died on March 28, 2000 in Melbourne, Australia.

Selected highlights of credits include: Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977]

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QTC Whos Who Sheila BradleySheila Bradley

Actor

Sheila is one of the country’s most experienced and best-loved music theatre stars, with a career that spans 60 years working in England and Australia. Sheila’s wonderful career includes opposite Alfred Drake in Kismet at the London Palladium. Sheila was brought to Australia in the 1950s by J.C. Williamson’s to play the lead in Grab Me A Gondola, and since then has had leading roles in Once Upon A Mattress, The King And I, Finian’s Rainbow, The Wizard Of Oz, Nunsence Ii, Threepenny Opera and numerous straight plays and comedies. She was the original Nancy in the Australian production of Oliver! and also starred in Charlie’s Aunt, Mame, Hello, Dolly!, Canterbury Tales (NZ), Cowardy Custard, Orpheus In The Underworld, Follies In Concert (twice), Me And My Girl, Crazy For You, My Fair Lady, My Fair Lady In Concert, Jolson & The Pirates Of Penzance. Sheila has performed in several pantomimes and created her one-woman show The Cat, The Rat And Me, written by  Tony Sheldon, at the Melbourne Cabaret Festival. 

Selected highlights of credits include: Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Mike BridgesMike Bridges

(aka Michael Bridges)
Designer

After completing the theatre design course run by the English National Opera in England, Mike returned to Australia in 1973 at the invitation of the Australian Opera where he worked on productions including The Merry Widow, La Traviata, and Midsummer Nights Dream. In 1979, he received the designers development grant from the Australia Council and designed several theatre productions including They Shoot Horses Don’t They for La Boîte Theatre in Brisbane. In the 1980s, Mike worked for the Queensland Theatre Company, designed Carmen for the Queensland Ballet and Mary Stuart for the Queensland Opera Company. Mike was designer for Festival 82 and the Artistic Director of a Commonwealth Gala held in the presence of Her Majesty the Queen and HRH the Duke of Edinburgh in October 1982 at Her Majesties Theatre in Brisbane.

Selected highlights of credits include: Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] Carmen (Suncorp) [8 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Mary Stuart (SGIO) [19 February 1980]

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QTC Whos Who Bille Brown 1Bille Brown AM

in memoriam

Actor
QTC Associate Artist

A Drama graduate of the University of Queensland, Bille Brown is a well-known Shakespearean actor. He began with the Queensland Theatre Company and, later, was a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) in Stratford and London. While with the RSC, he was one of its few commissioned writers. Bille Brown AM has been recognized twice in the Australian Honors System. On 1 January 2001 he was granted the Centenary Medal “for distinguished service to the arts” and on 26 January 2011, Bille was named as a Member of the Order of Australia “for service to the performing arts as an actor and playwright, and to education”. 

Selected highlights of credits include: Twelfth Night (Suncorp) [20 August 1992] The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] Cheapside (Cremorne) [19 May 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] The Rivals (SGIO) [27 June 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Mandrake (SGIO) [1974] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973]  White with Wire Wheels (La Boite) [4 June 1973] President Wilson in Paris (La Boite) [22 May 1973] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] The Wrong Side of The Moon (SGIO) [1971]

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Order of Australia Australian Honours #1143437Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Noeline Brown 2Noeline Brown OAM

Actor

Noeline Mabel Brown OAM is an actress and comedian. Born 3 October 1938 in Sydney, Australia into a working class family from Sydney’s inner west, this queen of Australian comedy has done just about all there is to do on Australian TV, radio and the theatre stage. She has twice stood as a Labor Party candidate for the NSW Senate, in 1999 and 2003. But it is for her long and successful career in radio, television and theatre that Noeline is best known.  On TV, she is know for The Mavis Bramston Show, The Naked Vicar, Blankety Blanks and My Name’s McGooley. What’s Your’s?.  She has appeared in numerous films, television shows, theatrical productions and radio programs dating back to 1959. In film, she is known for Walkabout (1971), My Name’s McGooley, What’s Yours? (1966) and Razzle Dazzle (2007). She has been married to Tony Sattler since August 1, 1976.

Credits include: Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983]

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Order of Australia Australian Honours #2005295Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Carol Burns

Carol Burns

in memoriam

Actor
QTC Associate Artist

Carol Burns was born in Brisbane on 29 October 1947. She attended Brisbane state high school where she had elocution lessons. She then gained stage experience with the Brisbane Arts Theatre, making her debut in Hansel and Gretel (1965) ,  In 1970, she was a founder member of the Queensland Theatre Company, and graced the stage for the next 45 years. She made her final stage performance with the company in 2015 when she played Winnie in Happy Days. Burns also acted with companies in Sydney, Melbourne and South Australia, and directed Queensland Theatre Company productions of The Road to Mecca (2002) and A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (2003), as well as her own adaptation of Picnic at Hanging Rock (2013) for Brisbane Arts theatre. She gained a cult following worldwide as the butch biker Franky Doyle in the TV soap opera Prisoner and had guest roles in Australian TV shows such as Carson’s Law (1983), Blue Heelers (1998 / 2001),  All the Rivers Run (1983) and Eureka Stockade (1984). She starred in 2 feature films in Bad Blood (1981)  and  Strikebound (1984). In England, she appeared on TV in Taggart (1985), Strike It Rich (1986), Hannay (1989), The Bill (1989) and Casualty (1993 / 1994); and on stage in Summer of the Seventeenth Doll at Birmingham Repertory theatre (1990). After returning to Australia, she took a guest role in the police drama Heartbeat. Her first marriage ended in divorce. Burns married her second husband, composer Alan Lawrence in 1980. In 2003, Carol was honoured by the Actors Benevolent Fund (Queensland) with the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contribution as an actor and dirextor. She died 22 December 2015, of cancer aged 68.

Selected highlights of credits include: After the Ball (Suncorp) [3 July 1997] Blithe Spirit (Suncorp) [8 February 1996] The School for Scandal (Suncorp) [1 September 1995] Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973]  White with Wire Wheels (La Boite) [4 June 1973]  President Wilson in Paris (La Boite) [22 May 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown (tour) [4 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971] Wait Until Dark (SGIO) [23 September 1970]

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QTC Whos Who Gary Cameron 2Gary Cameron

Stage Management & Property Master

A career artisan with speciality props, model building and theatrical carpentry expertise. Gary has been based in Brisbane all his life, but his work has extended beyond the QTC through opera and extensive major film projects astonishing the world with his work in Moulin Rouge through the Matrix, Godzilla vs Kong, Thor: Ragnarok, Pirates of the Caribbean to Aquaman.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979]

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QTC Whos Who Reginald CameronReginald Cameron OAM

in memoriam

(aka Reg Cameron)
Actor

William Reginald Cameron was associated with the QTC since its foundation and worked with the ABC extensively in drama and education for over 2 decades. He was awarded the Order of Australia Medal in the 1994 Australia Day honours for his service to the performing arts and to arts administration.

Selected highlights of credits include: Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Suncorp) [8 March 1988] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice(SGIO) [16 March 1977] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] The Taming of the Shrew(SGIO) [2 April 1975] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970] The Royal Hunt of the Sun (SGIO) [1 October 1969]

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QTC Whos Who Geoff CartwrightGeoff Cartwright

(aka Geoffrey Cartwright)
Actor

Geoff Cartwright, born in Toowoomba in 1954, is an actor, director, audio book reader, poet, author and teacher. He played in some dozen QTC productions between 1977 and 1982, returning in 1994 for Dancing at Lughnasa, directed by Jennifer Flowers. He was in high demand between QTC and the TN! Theatre Company during that time before leaving Brisbane to work at the Marian Street Theatre, the Ensemble, the New England Theatre Company, the Riverina Theatre Company, the Hunter Valley Theatre Company, Bell Shakespeare Company, Belvoir St Theatre, Q Theatre, Crossroads Theatre, The Lookout Theatre Club, the Wayside Theatre, the Central Coast Theatre Company, Shakespeare on the Green and in a number of independent productions. His one man show, Yevtushenko’s Zima Junction, was performed in Sydney and Brisbane in 1994. He made a number of TV appearances notably for the Australian drama All Saints, and for his roles in White Collar Blue, Water Rats and Murder Call and won awards narrating audio books. He became a teacher of Drama and English in secondary schools in 2002 and between 2007 and 2019, he was artistic director of the community theatre company, The Rough Hewn Theatre Troupe, which called the Star of the Sea Theatre in Manly, NSW as its home and which became a stepping stone for freshly graduated professional actors. Of all his work, it was in QTC’s Clowneroonies (1978/79) where he had the most fun he’s ever had in the theatre.

Selected highlights of credits include: Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Flight Path (SGIO) [25 January 1978]

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QTC Whos Who Diane CilentoDiane Cilento

in memoriam

Actor

Born in Brisbane on 5 October 1933, the daughter of physicians, much to their initial disappointment, Diane decided against following them into the medical profession. After winning a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, at the age of 17, her career in film, theatre and TV began in the UK. By now married to Sean Connery – whom she had met in 1957 in an ITV production of Eugene O’Neill’s Anna Christie, and with whom she had a son – Cilento made a brief sortie into Hollywood. Back in the UK, Cilento made a few more films, culminating in The Wicker Man in 1973, written by Anthony Shaffer, whom she was to marry 12 years later. After her divorce from Connery, Cilento returned to Australia and retired from cinema, but not acting. She also returned to her first love – the theatre. She had already appeared on Broadway in Tiger at the Gates (1956) for which she received a Tony award, Heartbreak House (1959-60), and  The Good Soup (1960). Cilento had also been busy in the London theatre in the 1950s and 60s. Roles in The Changeling, The Big Knife, Miss Julie (perfect in the title role at the Lyric Hammersmith) and other plays at the Royal Court all gave her more satisfaction than her films. In the 1980s, she settled in Mossman, Queensland, where she built her own outdoor amphitheatre called the Karnak Playhouse in the rainforest. She passed away at age 78 on 6 October 2011 in Northern Queensland.

Credits include: The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975]

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QTC Whos Who David ClendinningDavid Clendinning

Actor
QTC Associate Artist

One of Brisbane’s best loved actors with decades of experience in all forms of stage, TV, film and radio, David Clendinning was born in Townsville in August 1937, and spent his childhood years in North Queensland, before moving to Brisbane.  He gained a first class honours degree in French language and literature, and in film known for Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles (2001), Jeopardy (2002) and The Surfer (1987), but his treading the boards for the Queensland Theatre Company, Melbourne Theatre Company, Victoria State Opera and Lyric Opera of Queensland showcases his great diversity in over 80 professional productions ranging from Shakespeare to opera to musical comedy.

Selected highlights of credits include: Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Flight Path (SGIO) [25 January 1978] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971]

credits on AusStage AusStage #1056
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QTC Whos Who Gillian CoarGillian Coar

in memoriam

Executive Officer & Secretary to the Board

The 1st employee of the Queensland Theatre Company hired by Alan Edwards AM MBE. Gil remained his ever loyal and highly efficient Executive Assistant for 17 years, typically positioned at her desk next to Alan’s office door, in many ways his ‘gatekeeper’ to ensure Alan had the focus he needed without distractions, which certainly helped Alan deliver QTC season plans, and individual productions of excellence, year after year.

Selected highlights of credits include: Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] I’ve Come about the Suicide (Cremorne) [24 May 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Insignificance (SGIO) [30 July 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Percy and Rose (SGIO) [23 October 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Flight Path (SGIO) [25 January 1978] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Kingdom of Earth (SGIO) [28 April 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] An Evening with Robert Burns (SGIO) [7 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] The Owl and the Pussycat Went to See… (SGIO) [26 December 1974] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (SGIO) [22 August 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] The Rivals (SGIO) [27 June 1974] Godspell (SGIO) [2 May 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Godspell (tour) [March 1974] Mandrake (SGIO) [1974] Aladdin (SGIO) [27 December 1973] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds (SGIO) [1 November 1973] Old Times (SGIO) [30 August 1973] Theatre Techniques Week (tour) [19 August 1973] Theatre Experience Week (tour) [12 August 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] A Masque in Honour of the City of Brisbane (SGIO) [29 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] Puss in Boots (SGIO) [1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] The Associates (SGIO) [5 June 1971] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971] The Wrong Side Of The Moon (SGIO) [1971] Wait Until Dark (SGIO) [23 September 1970] Philadephia Here I Come (SGIO) [3 July 1970] Philadelphia Here I Come! (SGIO) [3 July 1970] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

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QTC Whos Who Peter CookeDr Peter Cooke AM

Designer

Dr Peter Robert Cooke AM has a decorated history of achievement in the education field and theatrical design practice. He is an internationally recognized performing arts educationalist, researcher and practitioner. Born in Brisbane and educated in Kuala Lumpur, Canberra, Southport and Sydney, Peter was the first graduate of the Theatre Design Course at the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA). He earned his PhD at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. Peter is a member of the NIDA Foundation Trust and of the governing NIDA Company. Peter has taught and lectured extensively throughout Southeast Asia – including at the National School of Drama in New Delhi, India. Over 4 decades Peter has designed over 150 productions across the disciplines of drama, opera, dance, puppetry, music-theater, television, casinos and large-scale events. For service to the performing arts through theatrical design education, research and administration, Peter was awarded the Order of Australia OAM in 2008, and the Order of Australia AM in 2017 for significant service to the performing arts, and to education, as an academic and administrator, particularly to theatre and dance.

Selected highlights of credits include: Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] The Rake’s Progress (SGIO) [20 September 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] The Triumph of Honour (SGIO) [29 July 1978] The Magic Flute (SGIO) [22 July 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] The Gypsy Baron (SGIO) [14 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977] Il Trovatore (SGIO) [29 September 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] Cenerentola (SGIO) [30 October 1976] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] Kingdom of Earth (SGIO) [28 April 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] Carmen (SGIO) [30 October 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974]
credits on AusStage AusStage #3028
Order of Australia Australian Honours #1154699Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who June Craw 3June Craw OAM

Finance & Business Officer

June Alison Craw OAM was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day 1999 Honours List for her service to arts administration through The Queensland Theatre Company. In 2010, June was honoured by the Actors Benevolent Fund (Queensland) with the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contribution as an arts administrator.

Selected highlights of credits include: Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] I’ve Come about the Suicide (Cremorne) [24 May 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Insignificance (SGIO) [30 July 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Percy and Rose (SGIO) [23 October 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978]

credits on AusStage AusStage #543547
Order of Australia Australian Honours #870443Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Karen CroneKaren Crone

Actor and Choreographer

Karen started working as a professional actor with the Queensland Theatre Company in 1981 and has been connected with the company ever since.She additionally runs her own theatrical company, as well as directing and choreographing for a huge range of organizations. Today, she is regarded as Queensland’s first lady of theatre

Selected highlights of credits include: Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Travelling North (SGIO) [August 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Elaine CusickElaine Cusick

Actor

Elaine began a two-year course at NIDA in 1959 and in 1960, graduated with the first batch of 23 students with a Diploma in Acting. In film Elaine is known for Fortress (1985), Robbery Under Arms (1985), Silent Reach (1983).and also in the 1980’s in TV, A Country Practice and Prisoner.

Selected highlights of credits include: Blithe Spirit (Suncorp) [8 February 1996] Season’s Greetings (Suncorp) [8 November 1990] Whose Beach Is It Anyway? (Cremorne) [21 August 1987] The Slaughter of St Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] The Gin Game (Brisbane) [May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Philadelphia Here I Come! (SGIO) [3 July 1970] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

credits on AusStage AusStage #3264
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QTC Whos Who Paul DellitPaul Dellit OAM

Actor

Paul Anthony Dellit was born on the Gold Coast and grew up in Redcliffe.  8 years of piano lessons resulted in a job at the age of 16 playing piano in a Chinese Restaurant. After graduating from QUT, her began working as an actor, musician, director, composer, musical director and producer for various companies such as Queensland Theatre Company, La Boite Theatre Company, Opera Queensland, Brisbane City Council, Adelaide Festival Centre, Queensland Arts Council, Brisbane Festival, Queensland Music Festival, Seymour Productions and Queensland Performing Arts Centre (QPAC). In 2009 he became a Producer at QPAC, and for over 30 years, has worked for the Actors’ & Entertainers’ Benevolent Fund (Qld), many as its President. He was also responsible for setting up the QUT Gardens Theatre. Paul has served on various boards and committees including the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA) and the Music Theatre Panel for the Helpmann Awards. He has been arts editor for QNews; arts commentator on the Melbourne radio programme Broadway at Bedtime; a Queensland theatre reviewer for Stage Whispers; and Editor of  A Little Gossip. In 2003, he was awarded a Centenary Medal for his services to the arts, In June 2017 on the Queen’s Birthday honours list, he was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for services to the performing arts in Queensland. In 2022 he was awarded the Gold Matilda Award for service to the arts in Queensland, and received the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Performing Arts in Queensland. Since June 2021, Paul had been the Manager/Creative Producer of the Moncrieff Entertainment Centre in Bundaberg.

Selected highlights of credits include: Shutterbug {RQTC} (Tour) [1987] Skinfree {RQTC} (Tour) [16 March 1987] The Sentimental Bloke {RQTC} (Suncorp) [2 February 1988]

credits on AusStage AusStage #226597
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QTC Whos Who Grant Dodwell 1Grant Dodwell

Actor

Grant Radnor Dodwell was born 2 July 1952 in Sydney, He is an Australian actor, producer, writer, director, voice artist, and drama teacher. Trained at NIDA, Grant has more than 40 years’ experience in the entertainment industry in theatre, TV and film appearing in many of Australia’s best known stage shows and television series. He is a triple recipient of the Silver Logie for Most Popular Actor. He is best known for his roles in television soap operas including as an original in A Country Practice and 2 roles and Home and Away and the 2008 feature film Men’s Group. On stage he has appeared with the Melbourne Theatre Company, The Queensland Theatre Company and Belvoir Street Theatre, and delivered turns in the musicals The Sentimental Bloke, You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown, Godspell, Sunset Boulevard and Anything Goes. Grant is a co-founder of Australian Theatre Live and is passionate about ensuring younger generations have affordable access to theatre. He is a consistent advocate for actors and theatre creatives, ensuring their work is preserved and celebrated both locally and abroad.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown (Tour) [4 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972]

credits on AusStage AusStage #3197
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QTC Whos Who Carmen DuncanCarmen Duncan

in memoriam

Actor

Carmen Duncan was born July 7, 1942 in Lismore, New South Wales. Carmen graduated from the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) in Sydney in 1961 and was an actress who was best known for her works in The Spoiler (1972), Number 96 (1972), Skyways (1979), A Country Practice (1981) and many more. Carmen would make appearances in many American TV series which included a run in As the World Turns (1956), Another World (1964), Ash vs Evil Dead (2015) and more. Duncan sat on the board of what would become the Media Entertainment Arts Alliance and remained active on the board for a long time. Carmen survived two bouts of cancer before a third took her life on 3 February 2019.

Credits include: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981]

credits on AusStage AusStage #6925
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Alan Edwards AM MBE

in memoriam

Artistic Director, Actor, Director

visit his memorial page for details:
Alan Edwards in Memorium

Selected highlights of credits include: Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] I’ve Come about the Suicide (Cremorne) [24 May 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Insignificance (SGIO) [30 July 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Percy and Rose (SGIO) [23 October 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Flight Path (SGIO) [25 January 1978] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Kingdom of Earth (SGIO) [28 April 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] An Evening with Robert Burns (SGIO) [7 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] The Owl and the Pussycat Went to See… (SGIO) [26 December 1974] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (SGIO) [22 August 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] The Rivals (SGIO) [27 June 1974] Godspell (SGIO) [2 May 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Godspell (tour) [March 1974] Mandrake (SGIO) [1974] Aladdin (SGIO) [27 December 1973] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds (SGIO) [1 November 1973] Old Times (SGIO) [30 August 1973] Theatre Techniques Week (tour) [19 August 1973] Theatre Experience Week (tour) [12 August 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973]  President Wilson in Paris (La Boite) [22 May 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] A Masque in Honour of the City of Brisbane (SGIO) [29 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] Puss in Boots (SGIO) [1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] The Associates (SGIO) [5 June 1971] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971] The Wrong Side Of The Moon (SGIO) [1971] Wait Until Dark (SGIO) [23 September 1970] Philadephia Here I Come (SGIO) [3 July 1970] Philadelphia Here I Come! (SGIO) [3 July 1970] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

https://TobySimkin.com/Alan-Edwards
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Order of Australia Australian Honours #870368Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Lindsay FairmanLindsay Fairman

Stage Management

Selected highlights of credits include: Night and Day (Suncorp) [19 July 1988] The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] Hard Times (Cremorne) [10 November 1987] God’s Best Country (Suncorp) [8 September 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] Pride and Prejudice (tour) [26 November 1985] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984]

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QTC Whos Who Noel FerrierNoel Ferrier AM

in memoriam

Actor

Noel Ferrier was born on December 20, 1930 in Melbourne, Victoria. He was a TV personality, comedian, stage & film actor and theatre producer. He had an extensive theatre career which spanned over 50 years. He appeared on TV in Riptide (1969), Skippy (1970), Homicide (1969), Division 4 (1970, 1971 and 1975), and Matlock Police (1973, 1974 and 1975). Known in film for The Year of Living Dangerously (1982), The Rollicking Adventures of Eliza Fraser (1976) and Paradise Road (1997). During the 1980s he focused on his first love of the stage. In 1982 he set up the musical theatre arm of the Elizabethan Theatre trust and produced a revival of The Sound of Music, starring Julie Anthony and a very successful restaging of The Pirates of Penzance featuring Jon English. Ferrier played both Colonel Pickering and Alfred P. Doolittle in the Victorian Symphony Orchestra’s My Fair Lady. His turn as Doolittle requiring a recasting of the chorus to ensure there were strong enough members to carry him off stage for the end of “Get me to the church on time”. For the STC he appeared in the original productions of David Williamson’s Son’s of Cain and The Perfectionist alongside Robyn Nevin and Hugo Weaving. In 1988 he became Artistic Director of the Marian Street Theatre. In 1991 Ferrier played Herod in a revival of Jesus Christ Superstar. In 1992, he joined Tom Burlinson in How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying in 1992 where he proceeded to steal the show with his performance as J.B Biggley. He was married to Suzanne de Berenger. He was awarded the AM (Member of the Order of Australia) in the 1989 Queen’s Birthday Honours List in recognition of service to the performing arts. He died on October 16, 1997 in Sydney, Australia. He is remembered for his trademark glasses and everpresent Cuban cigar.

Credits include: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Rodney FisherRodney Fisher AM

Director

Rodney Macpherson Fisher AM has worked in most major theatres in Australia, for all Australian State Theatre companies, Opera Australia, the Victorian State Opera, the Bavarian State Opera in Munich, the Royal Ballet in London, and Legs on the Wall. He has directed in England, Germany, Hungary, Hong Kong and at the Spoleto Festival, Charleston, South Carolina. He has directed theatre, opera, dance, film and video and has written several theatre pieces and screenplays. Rodney has been the recipient of many awards, including for “significant contribution to the theatre” from the Sydney Theatre Critics Circle. In the Queen’s Birthday 1988 Honours List, he was made a Member of the Order of Australia “on recognition of service to the performing arts as a director and writer

Credits include: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981]

credits on AusStage AusStage #644
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QTC Whos Who Margery FordeMargery Forde

(aka Margery Jones)
Actor

Margery Anne Forde and Michael Forde have received AWGIE Awards and Matilda Awards for their work in theatre. They also received the New South Wales Premier’s Literary Award for Best Stage Play for Milo’s Wake. Margery and Michael’s work is the subject of a Doctoral Thesis “From life, to page, to stage: Exploring theatrical artistry, community and storytelling with Margery and Michael Forde.” Margery’s most recent work as an actor was in daughter Katy Forde and Aleathea Monsour’s A Girl’s Guide to World War. Margery has received the Trust Award for Excellence for Outstanding Contribution to Theatre in Queensland and Australia, the Playlab Award for Services to New Work in Queensland and in January 2001, the Centenary Medal for distinguished service to the theatre in Queensland. In 2015, Margery and Michael were jointly honoured by the Actors Benevolent Fund (Queensland) with the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Performing Arts in Queensland as Actors, Playwrights, Directors and Mentor.  For more information on Michael Forde to honor his legacy, please see: https://playlabtheatre.com.au/playwright/michael-forde

Selected highlights of credits include: Seven Little Australians (Suncorp) [21 February 1991] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

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QTC Whos Who John FotheringhamRichard Fotheringham AM

Actor, Director & Writer

Emeritus Professor Richard Allen Fotheringham was former Chair of Queensland Theatre (twice). Since the 1970s, Richard has been an integral part of Queensland Theatre Company, having served as Queensland Theatre Chair twice and as a member of the Board. He was founding member of the Popular Theatre Troupe. and Emeritus Professor of the School of Communication and Arts, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Queensland. Professor Richard Fotheringham’s research interests include Australian drama, Australian performing arts policy, English Renaissance staging, textual criticism, and Australian stage comedy and staging Shakespeare in Australia. He was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the Queen’s Birthday 2019 Honours List for significant service to higher education, and to the performing arts.

Selected highlights of credits include: Good Morning 9B2 (SGIO) [23 May 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971]

credits on AusStage AusStage #447
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QTC Whos Who Murray FoyMurray Foy

in memoriam

Actor / Director / Education Officer

Murray Foy was born in Quirindi, NSW in 1935 and was educated at Street Laurence”s College Brisbane, and trained as a teacher at Kingsland Epiphany Cathedral School. He was accepted into the inaugural National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) class in 1959, and graduated in 1960 with classmates Robyn Nevin and Edward Hodgman among others. Murray continued working throughout his career as an actor, director, Artistic Director, playwright and theatre teacher. He served on the Australia Council for the Arts (now Australia Council) Theatre Board during the 1970s, and was a Senior Lecturer in Acting: Darling Downs Institution of Advanced Education (now University of Southern Queensland) 1978-1980 and the Artistic Director of the New England Theatre Company from 1980-1987. He was married to actor Kathryn (Kate) Wilson in 1975.  They had two children. Murray died in 1998 in Toowoomba, QLD.

Selected highlights of credits include: Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] The Typists (TIE Tour) [May 1976] Tufff… (TIE Tour) [May 1976] The Rainmaker (Tour) [1975] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] The Chocolate Frog / The Old Familiar Juice (La Boite) [18 June 1973] Mr Punch (TIE Tour) [1973/1974] The Man, the Spirit Fish and the Rainbow Snake (TIE Tour) [31 May 1972] The Badly Behaved Bunyip (TIE Tour) [31 May 1972] What’s In It For Me? (TIE Tour) [March 1972] Antigone (TIE Tour) [1972] That’s What I Said (TIE Tour) [1972] Philadelphia Here I Come! (SGIO) [3 July 1970] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

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QTC Whos Who Arthur FrameArthur Frame AM

Actor, Director, Writer, Director of Theatre in Education & Production Manager

Arthur George Ross Frame AM was born on March 15, 1949, and has worked for Arts Queensland, Queensland Theatre Company, was co-founder and Director of The Gallery Theatre with Ken Kennett OAM, The National Theatre at The Playhouse in Perth, London’s Royal Court Theatre, Radio 4KZ Innisfail and the Living Room Theatre Restaurant, Arthur was the CEO and Artistic Director of the Queensland Arts Council until August 2015. He served on the Board of Regional Arts Australia from 1999 to 2015. He served on the Board of the National Trust of Australia (Queensland) from 2011 to 2021. He was awarded the Centenary Medal in January, 2001 for distinguished contribution to the arts, and in the Queen’s Birthday 2008 Honours List was made Member of the Order of Australia for service to the performing arts and to the community through administrative and advisory roles with a range of organisations in Queensland and support for artists in rural and regional areas.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Jade Garden {RQTC} (Tour) [28 April 1986] Tufff… {RQTC} (Tour) [28 April 1986] Flowers for Algernon {RQTC} (Tour) [10 March 1986] New Australian Kid {RQTC} (Tour) [10 March 1986] The Legend of King O’Malley {QYT/RQTC} (Woodward) [21 October 1985] Once a Jolly Jumbuck {RQTC} (Tour) [29 April 1985] Flowers for Algernon {RQTC} (Tour) [29 April 1985] Tufff… {RQTC} (Tour) [25 February 1985] The Jade Garden {RQTC} (Tour) [25 February 1985] Insomnia {QYT/RQTC} (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Equus (tour) [3 March 1976] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973] White with Wire Wheels (La Boite) [4 June 1973] The Chocolate Frog / The Old Familiar Juice (La Boite) [18 June 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971]

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QTC Whos Who Frank GallacherFrank Gallacher

in memoriam

Actor / Director

Frank Gallacher was born on April 7, 1943 in Glasgow, Scotland. In 1962, aged 19, he was working in London when his parents and younger sister decided to emigrate to Australia. Gallacher declined to join them, preferring to remain in London, but emigrated to Brisbane a year later where he worked as a schoolteacher. He spent three years in Papua New Guinea teaching English. On his return to Brisbane, he joined an amateur theatre company, which eventually gained him admission to the Queensland Theatre Company. In 1977, Gallacher was in Melbourne, performing in David Williamson’s play The Club, and he remained with the Melbourne Theatre Company from then on. In 2005, he played Lear in the MTC production of King Lear. He was well known in the 1970s for his television roles in Shannon’s Mob and The Lost Islands. His film roles included Proof (1991), Dark City (1998), Till Human Voices Wake Us (2002), Peter Pan (2003), One Perfect Day (2004) and December Boys (2007). He died on February 23, 2009 in Melbourne, Victoria.

Selected highlights of credits include: An Evening with Robert Burns (SGIO) [7 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Wait Until Dark (SGIO) [23 September 1970]

credits on AusStage AusStage #2635
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QTC Whos Who Gregory GeschGregory Gesch

(aka Greg Gesch)
Actor and Director

Greg is the master of the 3 C’s. Contemplative, Considerate, Creative and additionally one of the nicest men in the Australian Theatre industry. Since the 1970’s, a cherished theatre director and leading actor who benefitted with years of training under Alan Edwards AM MBE. He has since voluntarily evolved his mission in promoting new opportunities for Australians. As an actor and director, he has dabbled in film and TV, but really it’s his love of the stage, the breadth and depth of his body of work which speaks for itself. Onstage he appeared nude in Equus, directed major stars in large musicals and classic plays, toured Queensland by vehicle bringing theatre to the outback, and has shared the stage with nearly all iconic actors in this Hall of Fame. It’s his offstage commitment in the development of the live arts and assistance to other theatrical individuals that makes Greg’s star shine even brighter. A self proclaimed luddite, in reality he is one of the few remaining guardians of Queensland’s theatrical memories, establishing the active online “QTC Back When” group to re-unite colleagues from 5 decades ago in order to share Queensland’s rapidly disappearing theatre history.

Selected highlights of credits include: Night and Day (Suncorp) [19 July 1988] The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] Count Dracula (Suncorp) [24 November 1987] God’s Best Country (Suncorp) [8 September 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] Home (Edward Street) [17 February 1981] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973]

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QTC Whos Who Reginald Gillam 4Reginald Gillam

(aka Reg Gillam)
Actor

Reg Gillam was born in Melbourne, and has worked as an actor extensively throughout Australia for Playbox, The Music Hall in Sydney, Marian Street Theatre, The Old Tote, and in London’s West End with Dame Peggy Ashcroft and Vanessa Redgrave.  Reg was a member of the National Theatre at the Old Vic. In film and TV he is known for The Battle of the Bulge (1965), Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Dr. Zhivago (1965), 1915 (1982), The Last Bastion (1984), Color Me Dead (1969), Mission: Impossible (1988 TV Series) and as Captain Wagstaff in Are You Being Served in Australia? with John Inman and June Bronhill (1980 TV Series).

Selected highlights of credits include: The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979]

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QTC Whos Who Eugene GilfedderEugene Gilfedder

Actor

Eugene Gilfedder has been involved with professional theatre and music performance since 1981. In that time he has accrued more than 100 theatre productions in the role of actor, director, writer, music director, sound artist or composer. He has worked extensively with all major theatre companies in Queensland including; the Queensland Theatre Company, La Boite, TN!, Grin and Tonic, Performing Arts Trust, 4MBS Classic FM, The Queensland Orchestra and many more. Interstate, he has worked with Performing Lines, Adelaide Festival, Sydney Festival, Marion St Theatre, Bell Shakespeare and others. He was co-director for Fractal Theatre from 1989-2000, who produced more than 20 radical theatre events on an independent basis. He has written an adaptation of Van Gogh’s letters, Theo, an illumination of a life, The Odyssey for Zen Zen Zo and The Performing Arts Trust; also a theatre realisation of Beethoven’s Letters, Mahler: A Matter of Life and Death and The Twilight of Wagner for 4MBS classic festivals. His original music/theatre piece, The Fiveways, was performed in the 2008 Brisbane Festival. In 2000 he gained the Melbourne Green Room Award for Best Actor and he is 6 times a recipient of the Matilda Award for excellence in Queensland theatre.

Selected highlights of credits include: A Different Drummer (Suncorp) [12 April 1988] The Slaughter of St Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Stephen Haddan 3Stephen Haddan

(aka Steve Hadden)
Actor

Steve Haddan is a performer of insight and skill. Toowoomba born and bred, after completing studies in journalism, drama and Australian History at the University of Queensland in 1980, Steve spent two years as a professional actor, starring in major productions with the La Boite and Queensland Theatre Companies. In 2003, Steve shared the stage with Geoffrey Rush, giving a show stopping performance as his alter ego “Molly” Meldrum at a gala tribute to commemorate the career of the company’s long serving Artistic Director, the late Alan Edwards. In a richly textured career now extending beyond 40 years, Steve’s work as an author, comic satirist, performer and keynote speaker has given enormous enjoyment to thousands of people.

Selected highlights of credits include: Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Annie (Her Majesty’s) [26 November 1981] Annie (Tour) [1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981]

https://SteveHaddan.com.au
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QTC Whos Who Ron HaddrickRon Haddrick AM MBE

in memoriam

(aka Ronald Haddrick)
Actor

Ronald Norman Haddrick was one of Australia’s gentlemen actors whose 60-plus year career spanned radio, TV and theatre. Born on April 9 in Adelaide in 1929, he started working in Adelaide as a dental technician but found himself drawn to dramas on local radio. A keen cricketer, his dreams of playing for the Australian cricket team took a different turn when the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre (now the Royal Shakespeare Theatre) played in Adelaide. English actor Anthony Quayle, who was managing the company, held auditions, which led to Haddrick joining the company at Stratford-Upon-Avon. Ron found himself on stage with Olivier, Redgrave, Gielgud, Harry Andrews, Edith Evans and Peggy Ashcroft. His career ranged from 5 seasons with the Royal Shakespeare Theatre company to frequent appearances at the Old Tote Theatre Company, the Nimrod Theatre Company the Sydney Theatre Company and the QTC. Haddrick combined his career on stage with TV including The Outcasts (1962) and The Stranger (1964), as well as appearances in, among other things, popular series such as Hunter, Sons and Daughters, Water Rats, Home and Away, Homicide and Underbelly. Haddrick married in 1956. The Haddricks returned to Sydney where Ron joined the Elizabethan Theatre Trust, playing Alf Cook in the world premiere of Alan Seymour’s The One Day of the Year. The Haddricks bought a home, but on the mortgage application, Ron described himself as a dental technician, fearing that loans to actors were more difficult to secure. In 1963 University of NSW drama professor Robert Quentin told Haddrick he was starting the Old Tote Theatre Company and invited him to star in the first production, The Cherry Orchard. This marked the start of a long association with the Old Tote and nearly 30 years of almost continual work. Memorable stage shows included David Williamson’s The Club, which toured London after performances in Australia, and STC’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. In the 1980s he played many roles for the Nimrod, STC, Marian Street Theatre and Queensland Theatre Company. He was awarded the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for his services to the arts in 1974. In 2012 he received the Actors Equity Lifetime Achievement Award and in The Queen’s Birthday 2013 Honours List he was made a Member of the Order of Australia for significant service to the performing arts as an actor and narrator.. Ron died on February 11, 2020, in Sydney.

Selected highlights of credits include: Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] The Rivals (SGIO) [5 August 1969]

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QTC Whos Who Douglas HedgeDouglas Hedge

in memoriam

Actor

Douglas had an extensive career over many decades. He worked across all areas of the Industry . A skilled character actor, he appeared in numerous television productions. He performed in many TV series from Blue Heelers to Water Rats to All Saints to Murder Call to GP to Janus to Phoenix and the series The Potato Factory. Douglas appeared in many films including Paperback Hero, Black Rock, Ground Zero, Evil Angels and Young Flynn. But his great love was the theatre and his first engagement was in the John Tasker production of Oedipus In Perth in the early 70’s.  While he had the privilege to work with the Sydney Theatre Company, The Ensemble, Belvoir and The Q Theatre-along with the national tour of The Importance of Being Earnest with Dame Patricia Routledge, it was his association with The Queensland Theatre Company, The Melbourne Theatre Company and The State Theatre Company of South Australia that marked the big chapters of his stage career. He had the fortune to work at a time when theatre companies collaborated with a stable of actors working together as an ensemble-an environment that he thrived in. He had great respect for the history of the Australian theatre and having an elephant’s memory, could recall the most obscure anecdote or titbit of theatrical trivia. His 10th Anniversary book THE COMPANY WE KEEP, is a testament to that. He died on October 14, 2019 in Gosford, New South Wales.

Selected highlights of credits include: Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Flight Path (SGIO) [25 January 1978] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Mandrake (SGIO) [1974] Old Times (SGIO) [30 August 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973] The Chocolate Frog / The Old Familiar Juice (La Boite) [18 June 1973]  White with Wire Wheels (La Boite) [4 June 1973]

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QTC Whos Who Jamie HensonJamie Henson

(aka James Henson)
Lighting Designer & Stage Management

Jamie became interested in the Performing Arts in 1969 as a chorister at the Church of England School, Brisbane. While completing his senior matriculation he performed in many Gilbert and Sullivan productions and joined the stage crew in grade 9. In 1977, he won an Elizabeth Scholarship (acting and technical). He has worked as a Props master, Dresser, Lighting Technician, Lighting Designer and in Stage Management for most of Queensland’s performing arts companies. At the age of 21, he was the Resident Lighting Designer of the Queensland Theatre Company and within 6 years has designed over 100 productions. Jamie has since designed for Nimrod, Queensland Opera, South Australian Opera, Stage company and Melbourne & Sydney Theatre companies, Marionette Theatre of Australia, Melbourne International Festival of the Arts, Sydney Festival, Queensland Music Festival, International Concert Attractions and the Gordon Frost Organisation. In 1995, he was technical manager for Beauty and the Beast. In 1996/97, he travelled the world with TAP DOGS as Company / Production manager/ Lighting realiser. Jamie studied for Advance Diploma of Arts and Entertainment Management at Deakin University. In 1999 he became the Operations Manager in Production for the Victorian Arts Centre for 5 years. In 2004, he worked on the 15th Asian Games in Doha, Qatar. He has lectured at Melbourne Polytechnic and at the National Institute Circus Arts. By 2022, he has worked on over 230 shows around the world as well as judging Musical Theatre productions for the Green Room Awards Association.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] The Aussie Battler Show (Tour) [1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977]

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QTC Whos Who Kevin HidesKevin Hides

Actor

Queensland Theatre: A Conversation, Sweeney Todd, Christmas at Turkey Beach, The Cavalcaders, The Threepenny Opera, Diving for Pearls, Romeo & Juliet, Money and Friends, Essington Lewis: I Am Work, On The Whipping Side, Seven Little Australians, A Month in the Country, Season’s Greetings, The Man From Muckinupin, A Chorus of Disapproval, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Loves Labour Lost, Who Cares?, Baby, Macbeth, The Three Sisters, Henry V, In Duty Bound, Much Ado About Nothing, Applause, Amadeus, Demolition Job, The Tempest, Hello, Dolly!, As You Like It. Other Credits: 4MBS Classic Arts Shakespeare Festival: The Comedy of Errors, Cribbie, Henry V; World Theatre Festival: The Trouble With Harry; La Boite Theatre Company: Closer (with Genre), Cosi; Harvest Rain Theatre Company: Much ado About Nothing; Twelfth Night Theatre Company: Run for your Wife; QPAC: Over the Top with Jim, A Christmas Carol; Acronym: Cyrano De Bergerac; Metaluna Theatre Company: Summer of the Aliens, The Adman; Lyric Opera of Queensland: Carmen, The Abduction From The Seraglio, La Belle Helene, Die Fledermaus, Brigadoon, The Pirates of Penzance, The Maid of the Mountains, The White Horse Inn; Q Theatre: The Sentimental Bloke, Baby. Film: Fatal Honeymoon, A Heartbeat Away, Dartworth, Stage Fright, Through My Eyes, The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course, Blurred, Mr Reliable, The Legend of Fred Paterson. Short Film: Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow, Twilight Tango. Television: Mabo, A Country Practice, Fat Cow Motel, Seconds to Spare, Cybergirl, Medivac, Fire II, Pacific Drive, The Last Resort, The Day of the Roses, Fire, Butterfly Island, Paradise Beach, Skippy, The Driver, Shark’s Paradise. Awards: Matilda Award – Outstanding Contribution to Queensland Theatre.

Selected highlights of credits include: A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Libby HigginLibby Higgin

Stage Management

Selected highlights of credits include: Clowneroonies (Tour) [1979]  The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973]  Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973]  The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973]  Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973]  Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973]  The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972]  Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972]  Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972]  She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971]

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QTC Whos Who Laurence HodgeLaurence Hodge

in memoriam

Actor

Prior to his body of work at the QTC, his many stage credits include Floating World, Much Ado About Nothing, and Richard III for Nimrod, and The Rainmaker for the Marion Street Theatre. In the world of TV, he is best known for his work in Pig in a Poke, Certain Women, Do I Have to Kill My Child?, The Restless Years and Glenview High,

Selected highlights of credits include: Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980]

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QTC Whos Who Hazel HowsonHazel Howson

in memoriam

Actor

Hazel joined the Brisbane Repertory Theatre in 1959, but did not actively engage in acting until 1961.  She was a member of a Revue Company which played for charity in country areas. In film and TV, Hazel was best known for Surrender in Paradise (1976), Bloodmoon (1990) and A Country Practice (1981).

Selected highlights of credits include: Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds (SGIO) [1 November 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971]

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QTC Whos Who Ivar KantsIvar Kants

Actor
QTC Associate Artist

Ivar Kants was born on July 19, 1949 in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. He is an actor, known in movies for Twelfth Night (1986), Silver City (1984) and BeastMaster (1999). He has been married to Jenny Kants since 1970. They have four children.

Selected highlights of credits include: King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971]

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QTC Whos Who Ellen KennedyEllen Kennedy

in memoriam

(aka Lenny)
Stage Management

Selected highlights of credits include: The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978]

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QTC Whos Who Ken KennettKen Kennett OAM

(aka Kenneth Kennett)
Actor & Publicist

Kenneth John Kennett is a well-known Australian theatrical identity. He originally studied acting at The Central School of Drama, London and was subsequently given acting roles in a number of stage productions. He has produced over 50 plays and musicals. Ken was part of the foundation acting company of the Queensland Theatre Company. Ken was co-founder of The Gallery Theatre with Arthur Frame AM, He also became the Director of the Westfield Super Juniors, a group of young entertainers in Queensland. Ken co-founded the Fame Talent Agency, also based in Queensland. Ken was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day 2012 Honours List for service to the performing arts, particularly theatre, as an actor, writer and director.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4170
Order of Australia Australian Honours #1145340Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Lloyd King 2Lloyd King

Actor

Lloyd began his acting career with QTC’s theatre in education team, Roadwork, performing in shows for primary & high school students throughout Queensland. The highlight of this period was a flying tour taking the team into remote areas of the state and working with indigenous children. He spent the next 4 years working on main house productions for the company. Apart from QTC, Lloyd has also acted for the TN! Theatre Company, La Boite, Opera Queensland, The Sydney Theatre Company, Sydney’s New Theatre, and in independent productions at Sydney’s Belvoir Street, Tap Gallery, Pact and Stable Theatres. He has directed productions for New Theatre, Pact, Short + Sweet and community theatre companies in Sydney, as well as for Cabaret Latte in Melbourne. He has also performed at the Edinburgh Festival, the London Fringe, and in an acting role for Scottish Ballet. Off stage Lloyd has worked in TV management & production for the ABC, and coordinated the feature film development program, Aurora, for Screen NSW. Returning to his roots and passion for the stage, Lloyd took up further university study, researching a model of theatre for residents in aged care: retelling their life stories as artistic productions and therapeutic creativity. While he looks forward to coming back to Australia and his love of performing, in 2017 he set out on an adventure with his partner, heading to the UK to run a village pub.

Selected highlights of credits include: Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983]

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QTC Whos Who Robert KinghamRobert Kingham

(aka Rob Kingham)
Director & Actor

Robert Kingham was born in 1950 to a multi-generational theatre and music family. Rob trained as a theatre practitioner in the music department at the University of California San Diego, the British Theatre Institute London and Grotowski’s Theatre Laboratory in Poland. In London, he staged a music festical, and repeated in Boulogne, France directing Lebanese, Egyptian, Belgian and French actors. His career has spanned many decades with multidisciplinary experience across Europe, Australia and Asia. In addition to his work as a performer, director, educator and theatre administration, Rob is known in the business as the ‘Theatre Opener’. He made significant contributions in establishing performances in theatres such as the Lyric Theatre and Princess Theatre in Brisbane. Robert moved to Indonesia in late 1986 to work in Australia’s bilateral development cooperation program. He served as the ‘Face of Australia’ to Islamic communities throughout Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand. After 30 years working in South East Asia, Rob returned to Brisbane in 2016 to practice as an actor, mentor and active Associate of Actors’ & Entertainers’ Benevolent Fund of Queensland.

Selected highlights of credits include: King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] The Aussie Battler Show (Tour) [1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Genesis (Darling Downs & Brisbane) [May 1977] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] The Royal Hunt of the Sun (SGIO) [1 October 1969]

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QTC Whos Who Peter KowitzPeter Kowitz

Actor

One of Australias most versatile and accomplished actors, Peter has 4 times been nominated for AFI awards; 3 times for drama (Bodysurfer, The Long Way Home, and GP) and comedy (Supernova), winning Best Actor for Bodysurfer and The Long Way Home. In 1989 he received the Variety Heart award for Television Actor of the Year. He has been a regular and guest performer in numerous series, mini-series and tele-movies in the last 40 years, most recently as Crown Prosecutor Tony Gillies in Crownies and the critically acclaimed sequel Janet King. Peter is a regular theatre performer and has appeared with all major Australian theatre companies and toured to Germany and New Zealand with the Cate Blanchett directed production of Blackbird for the Sydney Theatre Company. He received the Sydney Theatre Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role in a Main Stage Production for his performance in The Floating World for Griffin Theatre in 2013. Peter has appeared regularly with Melbourne Theatre Company and Sydney Theatre Company and at the Ensemble. He recently performed with State Theatre of S.A. in Creditors and in 2019 appeared as Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman for QT. Most recently Peter performed in Simon Stephens’ two-hander Heisenberg at Melbourne Theatre Company and in 2022 toured Australia and New Zealand as the male lead Nick Lane in the Bob Dylan inspired musical play Girl From The North Country.

Selected highlights of credits include: Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] For Years I Couldnt Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Kingdom of Earth (SGIO) [28 April 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975]

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QTC Whos Who John KrummellJohn Krummel OAM

Actor / Director
Sydney Casting & Repertoire Consultant

John Charles Krummel was born on August 20, 1944 in Broken Hill, New South Wales. A graduate from the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) he went on to perform in many productions for the Old Tote (Theatre) in Sydney and for the Nimrod (Theatre). In later years he forged a career as a Director and Administrator in theatre. He went on to serve as Director with the Queensland Theatre Company and the Marian Street Theatre in Killara, Sydney In film, he is known for Deathcheaters (1976), One Night Stand (1984) and Voyage Into Fear (1993). In the Australia Day 2003 Honours List, John was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia, for service to the arts, particularly through the Marian Street Theatre.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977]

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Order of Australia Australian Honours #1042725Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Toni Lamond 3Toni Lamond AM

Actor

Patricia Lamond Lawman was born 29 March 1932, professionally known as Toni Lamond. An Australian vaudevillian, cabaret performer, singer, actress, dancer, and comedian, she has had a successful career  internationally including in the USA and UK. She learned to tap dance at 8 and began her professional career at the age of 10 when she sang on the radio while touring with her vaudevillian parents in variety shows. Lamond started her career as a variety entertainer at only ten and was the first woman in the world to host a midday show. The second was her younger half-sister Helen Reddy. She was given the nickname of “Lolly-Legs Lamond” by actor Noel Ferrier, after being voted as having the second-best pair of legs in TV while on In Melbourne Tonight. Lamond was a regular in a number of ’70s TV shows, such as Number 96 and Graham Kennedy’s In Melbourne Tonight. She later became the first woman in the world to compère a variety TV show. She debuted on the New York stage with a production Cabaret at the age of 67. On her return to Australia in the mid 1990s, she performed in shows including Wildcat42nd Street, The Pirates of Penzance, and My Fair Lady. In 1986, she appeared on the US TV series Murder, She Wrote starring Angela Lansbury. She also appeared in films such as the 2007 Razzle Dazzle: A Journey Into Dance. She has starred in Australian productions of Oliver!, Annie Get Your Gun, The Pajama Game, Expresso Bongo, The Full Monty, Shout!, Follies in Concert, High Society, Beauty and the Beast and Gypsy. Fellow QTC Hall of Famer Tony Sheldon is her son. In the Queen’s Birthday 2003 Honours List, Toni was made a Member of the Order of Australia.

Credits include: Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973]

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QTC Whos Who Alan Lawrence 4Alan Lawrence

Composer

Alan Lawrence was born in 1949 in Hertfordshire. After studying at the Royal College of Music, he worked as both performer and composer in various roles but for the most part in the theatre. He worked for a number of companies, including the Old Vic Theatre Company in London, on tour in the UK and internationally. He first came to Australia in 1979, and  has written music for a number of Queensland Theatre Company productions including 3 of the popular Shakespeare in the Park series. In 1987 Lawrence established a recording studio in central London, writing and producing music for many TV productions and major exhibition spaces in Britain and Europe including the Museum of London and Granada Studios. In 1997 with his wife, the actress Carol Burns, returned to Queensland, composing a variety of orchestral and chamber works. He provided sound and music associated with the QTC 2015 production of Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days, a production which featured the final performance by Carol Burns, shortly before her untimely death. Since then, Lawrence moved to Rome. Lawrence was a 2002 Composer Affiliate of the Queensland Orchestra and has a PhD in composition from the University of Queensland.

Selected highlights of credits include: Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Mark LeeMark Lee

Actor

Mark Lee was born in 1958 in Sydney, Australia. He started off as a model and a coffeehouse singer. In 1969, he made his film debut in Strange Holiday (based on the novel by Jules Verne). He is an actor and director, best known in movies for his starring role in the blockbuster hit Gallipoli (1981), The Bet (2006) and the cult film The Everlasting Secret Family (1988). He spent some time as a musician, fronting prominent Sydney bands such as One Way Ticket and The Idle Poor, and performing in tandem with his Conservatorium-trained younger brother, David, who plays the violin. He appeared in the 1987 Australian TV drama Vietnam. In Sex Is a Four Letter Word, he played a gay man. Lee collaborated with James Belushi on the 1995 remake of Sahara

Credits include: Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Diane Leith 3Diane Leith

Administrator

Selected highlights of credits include: Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] I’ve Come about the Suicide (Cremorne) [24 May 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Insignificance (SGIO) [30 July 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Percy and Rose (SGIO) [23 October 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978]

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QTC Whos Who Nigel LevingsNigel Levings

Lighting Designer

He has designed lights for over 500 productions. He works extensively on operas, and has designed a large portion of Opera Australia’s repertoire. Some of his most significant works include operas such as The Demon at the Bregenz Festival and for Zurich Opera; Billy Budd for the Welsh National Opera, Opera Australia, Canadian Opera Company, and for the English National Opera; Nabucco for Opera Australia; Wozzeck for Opera Australia; L’Orfeo for Innsbrucker Festwochen der Alten Musik and the Berlin State Opera; A Midsummer Night’s Dream for the 1994 Edinburgh Festival; La Belle Vivette for the English National Opera; Simon Boccanegra for the Royal Opera House, Washington National Opera, and Dallas Opera; Falstaff for Théâtre du Châtelet; Idomeneo, Turandot, and The Barber of Seville for the Houston Grand Opera; and Queen of Spades for the Dallas Opera. He has also designed lights for Broadway musical shows The King and I and La Bohème, and the Asian tour of Jekyll & Hyde.

Selected highlights of credits include: Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Robin LovejoyRobin Lovejoy OBE

in memoriam

Director

Robin Casper Lovejoy (1923-1985), actor, theatre designer and artistic director, was born on 17 December 1923 at Labasa, Fiji, son of Casper Ebenezer Lovejoy, manager, and his wife Viti, née Clark. Robin was educated at Suva Boys’ Grammar School. In 1955 he joined the Australian Elizabethan Theatre Trust. He married English-born Patricia Lucy Hughes on 14 January 1957. One of Lovejoy’s early triumphs for the Elizabethan Theatre Trust Opera Company (Opera Australia) was directing a production of Peter Grimes in 1958. In 1961 he was awarded a Harkness Fellowship to study in the USA. Next year he directed La Bohème for the Sadler’s Wells Opera Company, London, and The Rivals for the Dallas Theater Center, USA. Returning to the Australian Elizabethan Theatre Trust, Lovejoy took charge (from 1964) of the development of Australian plays. The Old Tote Theatre Company, Sydney, where he was credited with consistently producing the ‘best professional drama in Australia’. In 1973 he directed the Old Tote’s production of Richard II, which opened the drama theatre of the Sydney Opera House, and the première of David Williamson’s play What If You Died Tomorrow?  He was appointed OBE in 1974. During the 1970s and early 1980s Lovejoy worked with the Victoria State Opera and the Queensland Theatre Company. A director (1977-85) of the Australian Elizabethan Theatre Trust, he also served (1982-85) as head of the directing and design courses for the National Institute of Dramatic Art. He died of cancer on 14 December 1985 at his home at Mosman.

Selected highlights of credits include: Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975]

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QTC Whos Who Joe MacColumJoe MacColum

in memoriam

Director, Speech and Drama Coach
QTC Associate Artist

Joe arrived in Australia in 1961 from Ireland where he had experience with the Abbey Theatre in Dublin (the Irish national theatre).  He was a tutor at NIDA from 1963 until 1970. In October 1972 Alan Edwards appointed Joe (a former NIDA staff colleague) as Associate Director of the Queensland Theatre Company. Joe remained in the post for 7 years and was involved in 30 productions before leaving for a freelance career.

Selected highlights of credits include: You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (SGIO) [22 August 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown (tour) [4 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971]

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QTC Whos Who Graham MacLeanGraham Maclean

in memoriam

Designer

Graham Maclean was one of Australia’s most experienced and admired designers who has designed numerous operas, ballet, musicals, plays, TV and film. Graham worked extensively in the USA, Asia and Europe with a preference for designing sets rather than costume. His formative years were at Como on the Georges River, Sydney. Later he moved to the Riverina near Albury, on the Murray. His first design was for a local Albury theatre group performance of South Pacific. Graham wanted to be an illustrator and was interested in costume (from an historical point of view). He loved history at school, and his history school book looked like a comic strip. He undertook dance lessons at the Victorian Ballet Company, but realized he proffered design An award-winning Australian designer who had has left a rich legacy in theatrical design, with his large body of his work with The Queensland Theatre Company, West Australian Opera Company, The Queensland Ballet and so many more, Graham Maclean’s long career in theatre design has taken him all over Australia, New Zealand, USA, Vienna and Indonesia. Graham designed the hugely successful Pirates of Penzance for Simon Gallagher, HMS Pinafore, and The Mikado. Other highlights of theatre designs include Noises Off for the State Theatre Company of South Australia, Six Dance Lessons In Six Weeks for Ensemble Theatre where he also designed productions of The Good Doctor, Proof, Rapture, Blister, Burn, Last Of The Red Hot Lovers, Animals Out Of Paper, Ninety, Brooklyn Boy, Let The Sunshine, Abigail’s Party, The Busy World Is Hushed, Rabbit Hole, Lotte’s Gift, Times Of My Life, Noises Off and Flatfoot. He additionally had a passion for illustrating children’s books. He died in Sydney in April 2019.

Selected highlights of credits include: On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979]

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QTC Whos Who Gayle McGregorGayle MacGregor

Wardrobe Mistress

Selected highlights of credits include: Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] The Barretts of Wimpole Street (Suncorp) [22 November 1988] Hard Times (Cremorne) [10 November 1987] Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Tony McGillAnthony McGill

(aka Tony McGill)
Actor

Anthony was born in Australia where he had an extensive theatrical career performing in national tours prior to globetrotting between London, UK, USA and Singapore. Performing credits include Cats (UK & international Tours); Guys and Dolls (UK tour, West End and Tel Aviv); High Society (UK tour); Wind in the Willows (Royal Opera House); West Side Story (Sage Theatre, Gateshead); Gypsy (Leicester Curve); Damn Yankees (Landor Theatre); Guys & Dolls (Upstairs at the Gatehouse); Much Ado About Nothing (Singapore Repertory Company); Sir Stamford Raffles (Wildrice Theatre); Jacques Brel is Alive and Well (Sing Theatre); Closer Than Ever (Adelaide Festival Centre); Take Flight (Adelaide Festival Centre); The Secret Garden (Gordon Frost Productions); 42nd Street (Helen Montague Productions). An accomplished Musical Director, Tony was also assistant conductor for the Australian productions of Anything Goes, The Phantom of the Opera and Sunset Boulevard. He was Musical Director/vocal coach for many performers including Marina Prior, Hugh Jackman and Geoffrey Rush. A founding member of the Australian comedy/vocal group, Combo Fiasco, Tony toured extensively with them for 12 years. From 2006 to 2011 Tony was Head of Musical Theatre at Lasalle College of the Arts, Singapore. In London, Tony has taught at Mountview Theatre Academy, the Urdang Academy and Associated Studios.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] The Jade Garden (Tour) [25 February 1985] Tufff… (Tour) [25 February 1985]  Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Annie (Tour) [November 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Andrew McFarlaneAndrew McFarlane

Actor

Andrew McFarlane was born in Albany, Western Australia, but grew up on a cattle station in Queensland. As a young adult, he studied law for a year in Melbourne, then turned to horticulture, and eventually decided on a career in acting. After graduating from NIDA (National Institute of Dramatic Art) in 1973, he was cast in Crawford’s drama series “Division 4.” A leading role on “The Sullivans” soon followed. McFarlane was among the original cast of “The Flying Doctors,” one of Australia’s most successful drama series to date. He has extensive credits in theatre, and has appeared in numerous productions, on some of Australia’s largest stages.

Credits include: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Scott McGregorScott McGregor

Actor

Scott McGregor was born on October 22, 1957 in Orange, New South Wales. He is an actor, television presenter and the managing director of the tour company ‘Railway Adventures’, which specializes in international and domestic tours by rail. Known in film for for Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (1995), Home and Away (1988) and 1915 (1982). In the 1980s McGregor had leading stage acting roles in various productions at the Perth Playhouse, Queensland Theatre Company, Marion St Theatre and Nimrod Company. From 1980 to early 2000s he had acting roles in many Australian TV series including The Young Doctors, Skyways, The Sullivans, Cop Shop, A Country Practice, Sons and Daughters, Police Rescue, Home and Away, Water Rats and All Saints.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Sally McKenzieSally McKenzie

Actor

Selected highlights of credits include: The Man From Mukinupin (Suncorp) [16 November 1989] Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] Night and Day (Suncorp) [19 July 1988] Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Suncorp) [8 March 1988] The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980]

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QTC Whos Who Aubrey MellorAubrey Mellor OAM

Artistic Director, Director

Successor to Alan Edwards as QTC’s 2nd Artistic Director. Awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day 1992 Honours List for service to the performing arts.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Man From Mukinupin (Suncorp) [16 November 1989] The Taming of the Shrew (Suncorp) [17 August 1989] Ghosts, (Cremorne) [4 July 1989] A Month of Sundays, (Cremorne) [29 March 1989] Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989]

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QTC Whos Who Keith MichellKeith Michell

in memoriam

Actor

Born November 30, 1926 in Adelaide, best known for his Emmy-winning portrayal in the acclaimed 1970 miniseries Six Wives of Henry VIII. He married Jeanette Sterke in 1956. He was an avid cheerleader for the macrobiotic diet. A veteran of the stage, in a 1963 production, he created the lead role in Irma La Douce in London and on Broadway. He went on to replace Richard Kiley as Don Quixote during the long run of Man of La Mancha, and replaced Gene Barry as Georges in the original production of La Cage aux Folles. From 1974-77, he served as artistic director of the Chichester Festival Theatre in a post once occupied by Laurence Olivier. He died November 19, 2015 at his home in Hampstead, London.

Credits include: The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Warren MitchellWarren Mitchell

in memoriam

Actor
QTC Associate Artist

Warren Mitchell was born (as Warren Misell) on January 14, 1926 in Stamford Hill, London, England. He studied at Gladys Gordon’s Academy of Dramatic Arts and later at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. He became an established radio performer and later a regular face on TV, appearing in the drama Requiem for a Heavyweight series Hancock’s Half Hour, Gormenghast and – most famously – as the lead character Alf Garnett in Till Death Do Us Part. Mitchell has a widely successful stage career, playing Shylock in The Merchant of Venice and Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman (for which he won an Olivier Award.) As a film actor, known for The Crawling Eye (1958), Jabberwocky (1977) and Carry on Cleo (1964). He was married to Constance Wake. Mitchell had a number of musical roles in his lengthy career, beginning with the role of Theophile in the original London production of Can-Can and the small role of Crookfinger Jake in The Threepenny Opera. He also sang briefly in the film Till Death Do Us Part and played Alfred Doolittle on the studio album of My Fair Lady. He died on November 14, 2015 in Royal Free Hospital, Hampstead, London.

Credits include: King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978]

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QTC Whos Who Phil MoyePhil Moye

Actor

Selected highlights of credits include: Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974]

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QTC Whos Who David Muir 2Sir David Muir, CMG

in memoriam

1st Chairman of the Board

Sir David was the champion of the concept of the QTC and the person that hired Alan Edwards. Sir David John Muir was born on 20 June 1916 in Brisbane, an educated at Kangaroo Point State and State Commercial High Schools. At school he learned shorthand and typing. He joined the Queensland Public Service in 1932, during the Depression. Slight, dark haired and of average height, Muir’s enthusiasm for the visual arts and film was central to the way he promoted Queensland while agent-general but perhaps his greatest passion was for theatre and opera. Foundation chairman of the Queensland Theatre Company in 1969-77, he was president of the Brisbane Light Opera Company and a patron of the Caloundra Chorale and the Little Theatre Group. Muir combined his experience in public administration with his love of the arts when he was appointed the first chairman of the Queensland Cultural Centre Trust in 1976, after being involved with the earliest development of the project. The trust’s duties included facilitating activities in the arts, science, culture and performing arts throughout Queensland and the development of the Performing Arts Centre and the buildings that would comprise the South Bank cultural precinct. In 1959 he was made Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in the Queen’s Birthday Honours. In 1961 this was elevated in the Queens Birthday honors to Knight Bachelor (Imperial). In 1986 Muir was the first recipient of the Queensland arts medal. Over the years, Sir David had parented the QTC from inception to its importance with the community, entering its “golden age”. Sir David died of cancer on 23 March, 1986.

The other original Board members were the Hon. Mr. Justice W.B. Campbell (later Sir Walter); Miss J. Whalley; Mrs. R. Stephens AM MBE; Lady Groom OBE; Mr. C. Brumby; the Lady Mayoress, Mrs. C. Jones; Professor D.E. McElwain; Mr. W.R.J. Riddel AM OBE (and later Chairman), and later, Mr. L.W.H. Butts CBE

Mr. Arthur Creedy (Queensland Government Director of Cultural Activities) served as an ex-officio Board member and as Acting Artistic Director until Alan Edwards appointment was made.

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QTC Whos Who Hugh MunroHugh Munro

(aka Hugh Monroe)
Choreographer & Actor

Entertainment producer for Expo 88 promotions. Simon Townsend’s Wonderworld Reporter. Original Captain Starlight development of many Starlight Rooms and 24hr Children’s television channel. Lead roles in Peter Pan, Paddington Bear, Pageant, La Cage Aux Follies, Sweeney Todd, Into the Woods, International performances of comedy cabaret.  Toured multiple  “theatre in education” shows nationally throughout Australia.

Selected highlights of credits include: Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Aesop’s Fables (Tour) [23 March 1981] Eat Your Heart Out (Tour) [30 May 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981]

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QTC Whos Who Dale MurisonDale Murison

Actor

Selected highlights of credits include: The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980]

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QTC Whos Who David NapierDavid Napier

Actor & Puppeteer

David was born in 1964 and his career started as a child performer on stage and TV.
 As a Director he’s made TV drama, children’s scifi, and acclaimed war documentaries. He’s been nominated for Best Direction in Children’s TV by the Australian Director’s Guild and his award-winning short films have played in numerous festivals and on networks around the world. A hallmark of his work is his good rapport with actors, attention to story, visual style, and putting more on screen than tight budgets usually allow. He’s also crafted a myriad of educational, corporate, and music videos for some of Australia’s leading entertainment and media companies. As a Post Production Supervisor, Editor, VFX Director and Consultant with a deep knowledge of modern production workflows and technologies, David contributes to feature films, TV, and new media projects of all shapes and sizes. He’s consulted on story and production development for productions in Australia and the UK. As Producer, he’s overseen children’s shows for the Nine, Seven and 10 Networks and is currently developing several major film, TV, and online projects. On the other side of the camera he’s an accomplished screen puppeteer and character performer with credits ranging from Jim Henson’s Muppets to children’s series for national Networks. As Post Supervisor and 2nd Unit Director some favorite features include: Black Water: Abyss, Great White, The Reef:Stalked, and Mercy Road.

Selected highlights of credits include: Polychrome (Cremorne Theatre) [7 July 1987] Briefs: Comrade / Well, You Can’t Win Them All / Polychrome (Cremorne Theatre) [7 July 1987] Animal Farm (Suncorp Theatre) [12 August 1986] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO Theatre) [21 February 1984] Applause (SGIO Theatre) [1 March 1983] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO Theatre) [2 February 1982]

https://DavidNapier.com
credits on AusStage AusStage #501683
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm0621009/Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Bryan NasonDr Bryan Nason AM

Director & Actor

Dr Bryan John Nason is a director, writer, actor and long-standing pioneer in live theatre in Queensland. Additionally nationally regarded as one of Australia’s leading interpreters of William Shakespeare. While studying chemistry and mathematics as well as teaching at University of Queensland, he was an active participant of the drama society. Following his graduation in the early 60s, he embarked on a career firmly based in the arts. He established theatre troupe Grin and Tonic, which directed the first Queensland Theatre Company production in 1969. Dr. Nason was Artistic Director of the TN! Theatre Company, directing Hamlet, Skitz n’ Frenzy, The Choir and others. Dr Nason retired from his leadership role in the troupe in 2009. Bryan was awarded the Centenary Medal in January 2001 for distinguished service to the performing arts, then in the Australia Day 2001 Honours List, made Member of the Order of Australia for service to the performing arts in Queensland, through the development of professional theatre groups and regional touring schedules, and through the Grin and Tonic Theatre Troupe. In 2004 he received the Queensland Performing Arts Trust’s (QPAT) prestigious Award for Excellence. In 2005, he was awarded Doctor of Letters honoris causa by the University of Queensland.

Selected highlights of credits include: Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] The Royal Hunt of the Sun (SGIO) [1 October 1969]

credits on AusStage AusStage #100
Order of Australia Australian Honours #870277Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Lloyd Nickson 2Lloyd Nickson

in memoriam

Director, Designer and Education Officer

Selected highlights of credits include: The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] Travelling North (SGIO & Tour) [August 1981] Is he Talking to Me? (Tour) [3 August 1981] Eat Your Heart Out (Tour) [1980] Coming! Crazy or Not! (Roadwork Tour) [23 March 1981] Aesop’s Fables (Roadwork Tour) [23 March 1981] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] The Voices of Green Willow Pond (Tour) [25 February 1980] The Taming of Dennis and Sharon (Tour) [April 1980] Accommodations (Tour) [March 1980] Damper: a Poetry Anthology (TIE Tour) [1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] I Know the Type (TIE Tour) [May 1979] Who’ll Come a-Flying? (TIE Tour) [May 1979] The Man Who Stole the World (TIE Tour) [May 1979] The Boy Who… (TIE Tour) [May 1979/1980] Whatsisname (TIE Tour) [May 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] City Slicks and Country Hicks (Tour) [10 July 1978] Mangrove Man / Patchwork Poetry (TIE Tour) [3 July 1978] Robbo’s Dream (Tour) [10 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978] Genesis (Darling Downs) [May 1977]

credits on AusStage AusStage #256993Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Peter NoblePeter Noble

in memoriam

(aka “Nobes“)
Actor

Born on 25th January 1943, an absolutely beloved character actor, and very integrated company member, “Nobes” was up for any and every challenge with a zest for life and love.  From straight serious acting to over-the-top fun, he quickly found himself as the centre of attention both on stage and off.  A great example of his fun characterization can be seen with him in the role of the head waiter of Harmonia Gardens establishing The Waiters’ Gallop in the brief video clip from the 1982 QTC production of Hello, Dolly!   He passed away on 22nd July 2019.

Selected highlights of credits include: They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981]

credits on AusStage AusStage #253784
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm4150935/Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Paul Parkinson 2Paul Parkinson

Property Master

Selected highlights of credits include: Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Percy and Rose (SGIO) [23 October 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981]

credits on AusStage AusStage #526854Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Hazel PhillipsHazel Phillips OAM

Actor

Hazel Julia Phillips was born in Wandsworth, England on 17 November 1929. She is an English Australian Gold Logie-award-winning singer, entertainer and television personality, with a notable career in Australia, and a career spanning every facet of the industry, including film, television, theatre, radio, cabaret and journalism. She has written several plays for stage. In film & TV known for Love and Monsters (2020), Number 96 (1972), Little White Lies (1996), Matlock Police, A Country Practice, G.P. and Pacific Drive. In the Queen’s Birthday 2005 Honours List she was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the entertainment industry, particularly in the areas of the performing arts and television, and to the community as a fundraiser for charitable groups. Hazel is an activist for alternative medicine, suffered a mild heart attack in 2009, and subsequently underwent hip replacement surgery.

Selected highlights of credits include: Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] Pride and Prejudice (SGIO) [26 November 1985] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980]

credits on AusStage AusStage #8135
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm0680444/
Order of Australia Australian Honours #1136286Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Gaye PooleGaye Poole

Actor

Gaye spent years as a professional actor with the Queensland Theatre Company, the Hole in the Wall Theatre (Perth), The Old Tote Theatre Company and Marian St Theatre (Sydney). She also had huge fun doing pub theatre in Newtown, Sydney. Since moving to New Zealand Gaye has directed 23 Carving in Ice Theatre productions and 13 staged readings between 2007-2019. For Theatre Studies at the University of Waikato she directed 13 productions, and 2 productions for the Sir Edmund Hillary Scholarship Programme. Gaye has taught Theatre Studies and Film Studies at the University of New South Wales, the University of Newcastle, University of Lodz, Poland, University of Waikato, New Zealand, and for shorter periods of time at the University of Debrecen, Hungary and the University of Turku, Finland. Gaye is also known in film and TV for Surrender in Paradise (1976), The Last One (2016) and The Young Doctors (1976).

Selected highlights of credits include: Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975]

credits on AusStage AusStage #226910
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm1301737/Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Lynne PorteousLynne Porteous

Actor

Lynne was in the J C Williamsons’ Gypsy production. Other stage credits include The Naked Vicar Show, Dimboola, Once Upon a Mattress, The Odd Couple (female version), Look Back in Anger, Play it Again Sam, Blue Kettle, Bench, Portia Coughlan, There’s One in Every Marriage and Dark of the Moon, and on screen she is known for The Night, the Prowler (1978), Home and Away (1988) and The Young Doctors (1976).

Selected highlights of credits include: Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4163
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QTC Whos Who Robin RamsayRobin Ramsay

Actor

Robin Ramsay was born on May 31, 1939 in Melbourne, Victoria. Ramsay is the grandson of William Ramsay, the founder and manufacturer of the Kiwi shoe polish brand. Ramsay studied at London’s Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, graduating in 1957. He worked briefly for the BBC then returned to Australia. He joined the fledgling Union Theatre Company in Melbourne, whose members included Zoe Caldwell and Barry Humphries. In 1964 he took the role of Fagin in the hit musical Oliver! on Broadway, a role he played for a further two years in New York, followed by a record-breaking national tour. He shared the bill with the Beatles, singing a song from the musical in a subsequently memorable edition of The Ed Sullivan Show. In 1966 Ramsay recreated his role of Fagin for a West End revival of Oliver!, with Marti Webb as Nancy, and revive his character in 1968 for a Japanese stage production of Oliver!. He appeared in the rural TV series Bellbird as Charlie Cousins. He went on to play Pontius Pilate in Jim Sharman’s original production of Jesus Christ Superstar. He was in the first production at the opening of the Sydney Opera House in 1972: playing MacHeath in The Threepenny Opera. He is known in movies for Running on Empty (1982), Dear Cardholder (1987) and Cosi (1996). Since 2009 Ramsay has been a curator of the forest retreat ‘Sanctuary Australia’ in northern NSW.

Credits include: The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975]

credits on AusStage AusStage #2442
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QTC Whos Who Kristin ReuterKristin Reuter

Stage Management & Props Craftsperson

Selected highlights of credits include: 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Travelling North (Brisbane) [August 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980]

credits on AusStage AusStage #492791Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Kate RichterKate Richter

Actor

Selected highlights of credits include: Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979]

credits on AusStage AusStage #257203Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who W.R.J. RIDDELW.R.J. Riddel AM OBE

in memoriam

Chairman of the Board

William Ronald John Riddel AM OBE was a member of the original Queensland Theatre Company Board of Directors, Mr. Riddel was appointed Chairman of the Board on the resignation of Sir David Muir in 1977. Mr Riddel chaired the Queensland Theatre Company through the second half of its golden age. Mr. Riddel was made OBE (Order of the British Empire) in January, 1973 for services to commerce & culture. In the Australia Day 1984 Honours List he was made Member of the Order of Australia for services to community. He passed away on 20 June 1995.

Order of Australia Australian Honours #873749Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who James RidewoodJames Ridewood

Designer
QTC Associate Artist

Selected highlights of credits include: The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Cheapside (Cremorne) [30 April 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] The Brass Hat (SGIO) [24 August 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] And the Big Men Fly (tour) [29 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Don Pasquale (SGIO) [26 June 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Il Seraglio (SGIO) [6 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] Godspell (SGIO) [2 May 1974]

credits on AusStage AusStage #2333Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Mick RodgerMick Rodger

in memoriam

Director

Mick Rodger had spent several years as a director in England. In Australia, his productions for Melbourne Theatre Company included Equus, The Double Dealer, The Lady From The Sea, Absurd Person Singular, The Game Of Love And Chance, The Fall Guy and Arden!, which Mick adapted from an Elizabethan classic. Mick had also written plays for M.T.C.’s Theatre-in- Education company, which played to young audiences.  Mick had also worked Sydney’s Old Tote Theatre Company regularly with highest including directing A Toast To Melba and Wild Oats.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980]

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QTC Whos Who Betty RossBetty Ross OAM

in memoriam

Actor

Betty Eileen Ross was born on November 19, 1918, and was an actress, known for her breadth of stage and radio work throughout Brisbane since 1939. In film and TV she is best know for Homicide (1964), The Irishman (1978) and Australian Dream (1987). Betty was awarded the O.A.M. (Order of Australia Medal) in the 2000 Queen’s New Years Honours List for her services to the entertainment industry as an actor in radio, television and theatre and to industry members, through the Queensland Branch of the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance and the Actors and Entertainers Benevolent Fund. Betty passed away on January 31, 2003.

Selected highlights of credits include: Count Dracula (Suncorp) [24 November 1987] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] Home (Edward Street) [17 February 1981] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4281
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm1193257/
Order of Australia Australian Honours #1130006 Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Geoffrey RushGeoffrey Rush AC

(aka Geoff Rush)
Actor & Director

Geoffrey Roy Rush was born on July 6, 1951, in Toowoomba, Queensland. He was raised in Brisbane, Queensland, after his parents split up. Geoff attended Everton Park State High School. His interest in the theatre led to his performing with the College Players, a theatrical group formed by Bryan Nason at the University of Queensland. While studying at the University between 1969 and 1971, Geoff was also active in the drama society with Bille Brown. He graduated a bachelor of arts from the University in 1972. In 1971 he made his professional stage debut at age 20 in “Wrong Side of the Moon” with the Queensland Theatre Company. Known for his classical repertory work, he scored an unexpected hit with his Queensland role as Snoopy in the musical “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown“. A few years later he moved to France to study but subsequently returned to his homeland within a short time and continued work as both actor and director with the Queensland Theatre Company. In the 1980s Geoff became a member of the State Theatre Company of South Australia. Geoff made an inauspicious debut in films with the feature Hoodwink (1981),but didn’t carry off his first major role until a movie of Twelfth Night (1986). Yet, he remained a durable presence on stage with acclaimed productions in “The Diary of a Madman” in 1989 and “The Government Inspector” in 1991. Geoff suffered a temporary nervous breakdown in 1992 due to overwork and anguish over his lack of career advancement. Within a few years film-goers finally began taking notice of Geoffrey after his performance in Children of the Revolution (1996). This led to the role of a lifetime as the highly dysfunctional piano prodigy in Shine (1996). Geoff’s astonishing tour-de-force performance won him every conceivable award imaginable, including the Oscar, Golden Globe, British Film Award and Australian Film Institute Award. “Shine” put Geoff on the Hollywood “A” list. He went on in film with Elizabeth (1998) and  Frida (2002). He’s also allowed himself to have a bit of fun in Mystery Men (1999), House on Haunted Hill (1999), The Banger Sisters (2002), Finding Nemo (2003) and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003). More than validating his early film success, 2 more Oscar nominations came his way in the same year for Quills (2000) (best actor) and Shakespeare in Love (1998). Geoff’s versatility continued  with his portrayals in The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2004), The King’s Speech (2010), The Eye of the Storm (2011), The Book Thief (2013), Final Portrait (2017) and Storm Boy (2019). In 2009 he made his Broadway debut in “Exit the King” co-starring Susan Sarandon. In January, 2001 he was awarded the Centenary Medal for service to the arts especially through a distinguished acting career. In the Australia Day 2014 Honours List he was made Companion of the Order of Australia for eminent service to the arts as a theatre performer, motion picture actor and film producer, as a role model and mentor for aspiring artists, and through support for, and promotion of, the Australian arts industry. He married classical actress Jane Menelaus in 1988 and has 2 children. 

Selected highlights of credits include: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] The Rivals (SGIO) [27 June 1974] Godspell (SGIO) [2 May 1974] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown (SGIO) [4 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Wrong Side Of The Moon (SGIO) [1971]

credits on AusStage AusStage #482
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm0001691
Order of Australia Australian Honours #1148818Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who June SalterJune Salter AM

in memoriam

Actor

June Marie Salter was born on June 22, 1932 in Bexley, Sydney, New South Wales. Her career began in 1952 when she abandoned a secretarial job for show biz. June featured in most of Australia’s major TV series, including Murder Call, A Country Practice, Neighbours, The Restless Years, The Sullivans and All Saints. Salter’s early professional career owed much to radio. In 1985 she played Queen Mary in Crown Matrimonial, Salter had coveted the role. As a devoted monarchist, she was unequivocally on the side of those who sought to preserve the prestige of the throne. Other notable successes came when she teamed with an old friend, Ruth Cracknell, to play a couple of eccentric spinsters in Lettice and Lovage, and her portrayal of the daffy clairvoyant Madame Arcari in Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit.  In film, she is known for Caddie (1976), ITV Play of the Week (1955) and The Last Bastion (1984). She was married to John Meillon, whom she divorced in 1971. In the Australia Day 1982 Honours List she was made Member of the Order of Australia for service to the performing arts. She died of cancer on September 15, 2001 in Sydney at the age of 69.

Credits include: Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4601
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm0759076
Order of Australia Australian Honours #869803Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Lewis SavageLewis Savage

Subscriptions Ticketing Manager

Selected highlights of credits include: Hard Times (Cremorne) [10 November 1987] Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] I’ve Come about the Suicide (Cremorne) [24 May 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [17 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Orwell (SGIO) [1 October 1986] Camille (Suncorp) [October 1986] Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Animal Farm (Suncorp) [12 August 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] The Slaughter of St. Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] Benefactors (Cremorne) [15 May 1986] Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] Baby (SGIO) [18 February 1986] A Pair of Claws (Cremorne) [29 October 1985] The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Insignificance (SGIO) [30 July 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Pack of Lies (SGIO) [11 June 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] Insomnia (SGIO) [5 November 1984] Percy and Rose (SGIO) [23 October 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978]

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QTC Whos Who Jenny SeedsmanJenny Seedsman

Actor & Choreographer

Jenny is an Australian actor working in Theatre, film, TV, radio and many, many audio books over the years. Jenny studied dance, drama, and music at the at the University of Melbourne and she graduated with a Bachelor of Performing Arts degree in 1977. In film and TV she is known for Neighbours (1985), Prisoner (1984), The Flying Doctors (from 1987 to 1990), Janus (from 1994 to 1995), Blue Heelers (1994) and State Coroner (1997). Jenny won the TDK Audio Book “Narrator of the Year” in 1997, for her recording of “Kings In Grass Castles”. She has also recorded “The Getting of Wisdom” for the ABC Heritage Collection.

Selected highlights of credits include: Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward St) [22 July 1981]

credits on AusStage AusStage #10043
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QTC Whos Who Tony SheldonTony Sheldon

Actor

Tony Sheldon (born 12 September 1955, in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia) is an Australian actor/singer best known for his work in theatre; he is also a writer. Sheldon comes from one of Australia’s leading theatrical families: his mother is Toni Lamond, his aunt Helen Reddy, and his grandmother Stella Lamond. He won the 2005 Helpmann Award, the Sydney Critics Award, the Mo Award and the Glugs Award for his performance as Roger de Bris in The Producers. He was also nominated for a Helpmann and a Green Room Award for his work in The Witches of Eastwick in 2003. He wrote and directed The Times of My Life at the Ensemble Theatre (2006).  Sheldon played more than 1,200 performances as Bernadette in Priscilla Queen of the Desert in Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland, West End (2009) and Toronto prior to the Broadway premiere in March 2011. He won the Green Room Award, Best Male Artist in a Leading Role, and was nominated for an Olivier Award (2010, London). He was nominated for the Tony Award as Best Actor in a Musical for his performance in Priscilla Queen of the Desert on Broadway.

Ccedits include: Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979]

credits on AusStage AusStage #622
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QTC Whos Who Cliff SimcoxCliff Simcox

Designer
QTC Associate Artist

Clifford Sidney Simcox was born in 1936 in the West Midlands, UK. He emigrated to Australia and commenced working life in Brisbane in 1953 as a display artist and graphic designer in the days of black and white TV in the early 60’s, evolving to work in an advertising agency as Graphic Designer and later as a freelance artist. Cliff was appointed as resident designer of staging, costume and relevant graphic design for the Queensland Theatre Company since its inception. He resigning in 1973 to return back to his UK homeland and work freelance. A short year later his heart told him Australia had become his new homeland and he returned to work with the Australian Opera (now Opera Australia) as an artisan in the props department for about 2 years and then going freelance specializing in scenic art, sculpture, speciality costumes and numerous handcrafted commissions. Some freelance collaborations over the years also included the Sydney Theatre Company; Sydney Dance Company; Belvoir Street Theatre; The Q Theatre; The Ensemble; F.X staging and Display; Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences; The Powerhouse Museum; Scenografic Studio; Encore Productions Themeworx (Gold Coast) and numerous productions with Reg Livermore …and numerous others until around 2002 when he chose to focus on his own fine arts with painting and modeling.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Chocolate Frog / The Old Familiar Juice (La Boite) [18 June 1973] President Wilson in Paris (La Boite) [22 May 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown (tour) [4 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971] Wait Until Dark (SGIO) [23 September 1970] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970] The Royal Hunt of the Sun (SGIO) [1 October 1969]

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QTC Whos Who Toby Simkin 1Toby Simkin

Stage Management, Actor, Animal Wrangler, Sound Designer, PA & QTC Guild Member

Toby James Simkin was born in Buckinghamshire, England to Australian parents in 1964 on the Queens birthday, April 21. He is a theatre producer with over 4 decades award-winning experience on Broadway, London and globally ranging from producing Domingo, Carreras, and Pavarotti in The 3 Tenors to Julie Andrews in Victor/Victoria but never forgetting his Australian roots with the Queensland Theatre Company, TN Theatre Company, The Lyric Opera, Queensland Marionette Theatre, The Australian Opera and Melbourne Theatre Company collectively becoming his training ground after turning down a NIDA placement. He has produced or managed over 200 shows, predominately on Broadway, in Toronto and London. Toby pioneered bringing technology to the theatrical industry in 1989 with a Broadway BBS; He devised, designed and implemented the worlds 1st online ticketing system (now Ticketmaster); He is credited with leading Broadway onto the web in the early 1990s. He pioneered video streaming over the internet, with Julie Andrews performing “Le Jazz Hot”, and created the 1st video email (with Elton John for AIDA); Commencing in 1997, he produced live chats with Chita Rivera, Julie Andrews, Liza Minnelli, Hal Prince, Stephen Sondheim, Carol Channing, Jerry Lewis, Arthur Miller, Brian Dennehy and John Kander. He pioneered putting Broadway shows on cruise ships in 2001. Shows and films that Toby co-produced have collectively garnered 3 x Tony Awards; 7 x Drama Desk Awards; 4 x Outer Critics Circle Awards; 2 x Lucille Lortel Awards; 3 x Drama League Awards; 1 x Theatre World Award; 1 x Olivier Award; 3 x OBIE Awards; 1 x Buy Broadway Founding Achievement Award; 1 x Gemini Award; 3 x China Arts Festival Awards; 1 x Chinese Culture Facility Award; and multiple Chinese Film Awards. Shows that Toby marketed have garnered an additional 243 Tony nominations and 96 wins.  In recent years, based in China, he has dedicated substantial time (and investment) to theatre educational programs, racing to preserve Queensland theatre history and producing with his Austral/Asia Live partners. 

Selected highlights of credits include: Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979]

https://TobySimkin.com
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QTC Whos Who Brian StaceyBrian Stacey

in memoriam

(aka “Stace“)
Musical Director

Brian James Stacey, was born on December 3, 1946 was passionately Australian, He entered the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music in 1964, graduating in 1967. In 1968 he married Monica Cunningham and had two daughters. He was employed as director of music, Southern Cross University (formerly Northern Rivers College of Advanced Education, Lismore). He then studied for a master’s degree in Music at the Queensland Conservatorium and started his career with the Queensland Ballet, the Australian Ballet, and Victoria State Opera. He refused to be pigeon-holed into one musical genre. He conducted for ballet, opera and musical theatre, unsurpassed in his direction of works by Sondheim and Bernstein.  Stacey could and did swing with the best of the jazz musicians, and brought to musicals such as The Phantom of the Opera and Sunset Boulevard the same professionalism and attention to detail that inspired his work in the classical repertoire. Stacey gave equal attention to all, from the most junior chorus member to the most established star. At performances Stacey would arrive on his Kawasaki motorbike, enter his dressing room in motorbike leathers and helmet, and minutes later emerge in tails carrying a baton, then step onto the podium to conduct anything from grand opera to cabaret. Having divorced his first wife, in 1986 he began his relationship with Kathryn Sadler, with whom he would remain until his death. The much-loved conductor died tragically on 25 October 1996 in a hit and run motorbike accident in Carlton, Melbourne (the driver later turned himself in), just prior to the premiere of Sunset Boulevard. Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber described Stacey’s death as “a loss to the world of music theatre, not just Australia”. The Brian Stacey Memorial Trust was launched at the Princess Theatre, Melbourne, in 1997 (on the first anniversary of his death). The Trust Fund served to endow a fellowship and commemorate Stacey’s life and work and his contribution to musical life before winding up in 2016. 

Selected highlights of credits include: Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979]

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QTC Whos Who Howard SteeleHoward Steele

Head Carpenter

Howard lead a tightly knit team of craftspeople in the engineering, fabrication, transportation, installation, load-out, and recycling of every set and many large prop pieces for every QTC production during his tenure. In addition to building the scenic pieces to the design requirements of QTC‘s designers, Howard and his team also constructed the physical theatre spaces for early Albert Park shows, including dressing rooms. Working with tight budgets, and even tighter timelines from the well organized Salisbury workshop space, he was highly regarded for his balance of technique, patience with nuance of theatricality, and encouraging the next generation of craftspeople.

Selected highlights of credits include: Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Gulls (Edward Street) [17 July 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Parker Pen (Edward Street) [8 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] They’re Playing Our Song (SGIO) [21 February 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Educating Rita (SGIO) [November 1983] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] Signal Driver (SGIO) [9 August 1983] Beecham (Edward Street) [27 July 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] Cannibals in the Wet Heat (Edward Street) [22 May 1983] Betrayal (Edward Street) [11 May 1983] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Virginia (Edward Street) [7 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] On Our Selection (SGIO) [6 November 1981] New Sky (Edward Street) [14 October 1981] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Upside Down at the Bottom of the World (Edward Street) [22 July 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] A Season at Clayton’s (Edward Street) [24 June 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [26 September 1979] Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Gone with Hardy (SGIO) [6 June 1979] Hedda Gabler (SGIO) [18 April 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Clowneroonies (SGIO) [8 December 1978] Sleuth (SGIO) [6 December 1978] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978] Big Toys (SGIO) [16 August 1978] Point of Departure (SGIO) [21 June 1978] King Lear (SGIO) [17 May 1978] Don’t Piddle Against the Wind, Mate (SGIO) [5 April 1978] When We Are Married (SGIO) [1 March 1978]

credits on AusStage AusStage #543480 Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Babette StephensBabette Stephens AM MBE

in memoriam

Actor & Board Member
QTC Associate Artist

Phyllis Babette Fergusson was born in London on April 26, 1910, and emigrated to Townsville in 1925. In 1928, she joined the Townsville Repertory Theatre. She joined the Brisbane Repertory Theatre in 1930 after a chance meeting in 1930 on a Brisbane tram with Repertory member Cecil Carson. She was cast Rutherford and Sons, directed by Rhoda Felgate. In 1931, she played the lead Shaw’s You Never Can Tell, opposite Tom Stephens (who she married in 1935, enjoying a long married life until Tom’s death in 1997). Babette led the company for many decades including building of La Boite Theatre. An original board member of the Queensland Theatre Company since foundation. Babette was awarded an MBE in 1972. In the Queen’s Birthday 1994 Honours List she was made Member of the Order of Australia for service to the performing arts. She passed away on 28 February 2001. Her funeral, held at St John’s Cathedral, Brisbane, was attended by around 500 people. She received a standing ovation. 

Selected highlights of credits include: Deathtrap (SGIO) [15 August 1979] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4214
Order of Australia Australian Honours #869698Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Kaye StevensonKaye Stevenson

Actor

In 2005, Kaye was honoured by the Actors Benevolent Fund (Queensland) with the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contribution as an actor.

Selected highlights of credits include: A Spring Song (Cremorne) [23 August 1988] Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Suncorp) [8 March 1988] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] 84 Charing Cross Road (SGIO) [25 October 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] I Sent a Letter to My Love (SGIO) [21 August 1981] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980]

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QTC Whos Who Darien Sticklen 2Darien Sticklen

Actor

Selected highlights of credits include: Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] Duet for One (SGIO) [27 March 1984] Cloudland (Edward Street) [2 November 1983] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Little Foxes (SGIO) [28 June 1983] Applause (SGIO) [1 March 1983] The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982]

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QTC Whos Who Steven TandySteven Tandy

Actor

Steven Tandy was born on October 23, 1952 in Sydney, NSW. He is a stage, TV and film actor. After graduating from NIDA in 1971, went on tour with QTC’s on two indigenous plays, by Michael Boddy, The Badly Behaved Bunyip and The Man, the Great Spirit Fish and the Rainbow Snake. Steven then landed the role of Tom Sullivan, the second eldest son in the iconic Australian TV series The Sullivans. He then auditioned for Alan Edwards in Sydney for the lead role of Valentine in Love For Love and resumed work for QTC with his name now above the title. All in all, he has worked on 14 productions for QTC, plus co productions with JUTE and MTC. Steven has additionally appeared often in many other film and stage roles including many musicals such as Camelot, Anything Goes, Mack and Mabel, Guys and Dolls, Oklahoma!, Cats, and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. He further received NIDA’s Diploma in Directing in 1995. He has been nominated for 5 Matilda Awards. For 13 years he played the role of Commodore Lassard in the Police Academy Show at Warner Bros. Movie World on the Gold Coast and is known for his portrayals in The Horseman (2008) and Mortified (2006).

Selected highlights of credits include: Love’s Labour’s Lost (Lyric Theatre) [23 September 1986] Who Cares? (Cremorne) [8 July 1986] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] The Man, the Spirit Fish and the Rainbow Snake (Tour) [31 May 1972] The Badly Behaved Bunyip (Tour) [31 May 1972]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4249
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QTC Whos Who Frank ThringFrank Thring

in memoriam

Actor

Francis William Thring (11 May 1926 – 29 December 1994) was an Australian character actor in radio, stage, television and film; as well as a theatre director. His career spanned more than 45 years, much of it spent alternating between stage, film and television. Perhaps best known for roles in Ben-Hur in 1959 and King of Kings in 1961. He was known for always wearing black and styling his home in black décor and for his flamboyant, often waspish, person. Thring was briefly married to actress Joan Cunliffe during the 1950s. The marriage ended in divorce. Joan lived in London, and was manager of both Rudolf Nureyev and Dame Margot Fonteyn. Thring was flamboyantly gay, but he wanted children and was greatly distressed when his marriage ended without issue. In 1994, Thring died from oesophageal cancer, aged 68.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979]

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QTC Whos Who Lyn TreadgoldLyn Treadgold

Actor & Director

Selected highlights of credits include: God’s Best Country (Suncorp) [8 September 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] The Slaughter of St Teresa’s Day (Suncorp) [3 June 1986] The Jade Garden {RQTC} (Tour) [28 April 1986] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Travelling North (SGIO) [August 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Gypsy (SGIO) [7 March 1980]

credits on AusStage AusStage #3847
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QTC Whos Who Geraldine TurnerGeraldine Turner OAM

Actor
QTC Associate Artist

Geraldine Turner’s name is synonymous with Australian show business. She trained in ballet for 10 years and was a member of the Ballet Theatre of Queensland. She studied classical singing at the Queensland Conservatorium for 5 years. In the early 1970s, she began her adult career with the Queensland Theatre Company. Geraldine regularly gives Master Classes in Musical Theatre. She has continued to perform roles in theatre companies and major musical productions throughout her career, as well as TV, film, recording and radio. Geraldine has also performed in operetta and in cabaret, in Australia and in New York, London, Vancouver and Berlin. In the recording world, Geraldine is recognized internationally as a Stephen Sondheim interpreter. She has received various Green Room Awards, Mo awards and a Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the performing arts in the Australia Day 1988 Honours List.  Geraldine published a memoir in 2022, Turner’s Turn which candidly describes her life and early career with the QTC.

Selected highlights of credits include: Geraldine Turner Sings (SGIO) [25 September 1980] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971]

credits on AusStage AusStage #2326
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Order of Australia Australian Honours #870548Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Duncan Wass 2Duncan Wass

Actor, Director & Design Draftsman

Duncan was born in England in 1951, arrived in Australia in 1952, and grew up in South Australia. He switched from road design to theatre via Queensland University in 1977. After a hectic 5 year stint at QTC, La Boite and TN Theatre Companies, he moved to Sydney and worked for JC Williamson, The Q, Sydney Theatre Company, and was in the inaugural cast of Les Miserables for Cameron Mackintosh. He also did a number of TV roles for the ABC, and spent 6 weeks as B1 in Bananas in Pyjamas. Bell Shakespeare occupied his attention for 6 years to 1999, before he went and taught English in Japan for a couple of years. With his new wife Barbara he ran a teahouse and gallery for 10 years, and moonlights as a tour guide for Scott MacGregor’s Railway Adventures.

Selected highlights of credits include: Demolition Job (Edward Street) [3 November 1982] The Tempest (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [5 September 1982] Einstein (SGIO) [24 August 1982] Saturday Sunday Monday (SGIO) [13 July 1982] Amadeus (SGIO) [8 June 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] Long Day’s Journey into Night (SGIO) [16 March 1982] Hello, Dolly! (SGIO) [2 February 1982] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] The Circle (SGIO) [8 May 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Annie (SGIO) [13 February 1981] Crushed by Desire (SGIO) [21 November 1980] Candida (SGIO) [17 October 1980] Outside Edge (SGIO) [12 September 1980] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979] Breaker Morant (SGIO) [14 March 1979] You Never Can Tell (SGIO) [7 February 1979] Habeas Corpus (SGIO) [25 October 1978] The Cherry Orchard (SGIO) [20 September 1978]

credits on AusStage AusStage #3753
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QTC Whos Who David WaltersDavid Walters

(aka David L. Walters)
Lighting Designer

For over 40 years David Walters has worked as a Lighting Designer in Iceland and Australia spanning designs for opera, theatre, ballet, dance, puppetry, circus, exhibitions, major events and architectural installations. From 1978 to 1986 David worked as a freelance lighting designer in Iceland where he is recognized as one of the pioneers in this field. In 1986 David returned to Australia to take up a position as Resident Lighting Designer with the Queensland Theatre Company on a yearly salary of $19,000. Here, he has worked on over 100 shows, over 37 years, and worked with every Artistic Director of the company. Since 1990, as a freelance designer, he has worked extensively throughout Australia, adapting with the development of technology, and designed for the Melbourne Theatre Company, Sydney Theatre Company, State Theatre Company of South Australia, Handspan, Playbox, La Boite, Rock ‘n’ Roll Circus, Nimrod, Company B, Expressions, Queensland Ballet, Australian Ballet, Opera Queensland, The Powerhouse, Queensland Performing Arts Centre, Zen Zen Zo, Topology and Bell Shakespeare Company. His work has toured extensively overseas and he has lectured in lighting design at several universities. He is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Queensland University of Technology. Throughout his professional career David has maintained close ties with Iceland where he has worked for the National Theatre, the National Opera and the Reykjavik City Theatre. In 2018, David was the recipient of The Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award by the Actors’ & Entertainers Benevolent Fund (Qld) for his outstanding contribution and continued support of the Arts Industry in Queensland. It was the first time a Lighting Designer had been recognised in the awards.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Man From Mukinupin (Suncorp) [6 November 1989] Lost Weekend (Cremorne) [28 September 1989] The Taming of the Shrew (Suncorp) [7 August 1989] Ghosts (Cremorne) [4 July 1989] Major Barbara (Suncorp) [23 May 1989] Dinkum Assorted (Suncorp) [21 February 1989] Whose Beach Is it Anyway? (Tour) [6 February 1989] Kris Makes a Machine (Cremorne) [10 November 1988] Night and Day (Suncorp) [9 July 1988] Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Suncorp) [8 March 1988] The Sentimental Bloke (Suncorp) [2 February 1988] Count Dracula (Suncorp) [24 November 1987] Hard Times (Cremorne) [10 November 1987] The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] God’s Best Country (Suncorp) [8 September 1987] Whose Beach Is It Anyway? (Cremorne) [21 August 1987] Well, You Can’t Win em All (Cremorne) [7 July 1987] Polychrome (Cremorne) [7 July 1987] Briefs: Comrade / Well, You Can’t Win Them All / Polychrome (Cremorne) [7 July 1987] Comrades (Cremorne) [7 July 1987] Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] Away (Cremorne) [5 May 1987] Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] A Chorus of Disapproval (Suncorp) [7 February 1987] Snoopy the Musical (Cremorne) [28 October 1986] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985]

credits on AusStage AusStage #3547Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who David WatersDavid Waters

Actor

Selected highlights of credits include: Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown (Tour) [4 September 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971]

credits on AusStage AusStage #229356Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who John WatsonJohn Watson

in memoriam

Production Manager & Lighting Designer

During his 7 years as the companies first Production Manager, responsible for the soaring growth of QTC’s technical resources, from a humble work-bench to a thriving enterprise, and lighting over 25 QTC productions.

Selected highlights of credits include: Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Last of the Knucklemen (SGIO) [22 June 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] For Years I Couldn’t Wear My Black (SGIO) [9 February 1977] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Kingdom of Earth (SGIO) [28 April 1976] Jumpers (SGIO) [24 March 1976] Hamlet (SGIO) [11 February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The One Day of the Year (SGIO) [24 September 1975] An Evening with Robert Burns (SGIO) [7 September 1975] One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (SGIO) [20 August 1975] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975] The Importance of Being Earnest (SGIO) [18 June 1975] Coralie Lansdowne Says No (SGIO) [21 May 1975] The Taming of the Shrew (SGIO) [2 April 1975] Equus (SGIO) [12 February 1975] The Owl and the Pussycat Went to See… (SGIO) [26 December 1974] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (SGIO) [22 August 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] The Rivals (SGIO) [27 June 1974] Godspell (SGIO) [2 May 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Godspell (tour) [March 1974] Mandrake (SGIO) [1974] Aladdin (SGIO) [27 December 1973] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds (SGIO) [1 November 1973] Old Times (SGIO) [30 August 1973] Theatre Techniques Week (tour) [19 August 1973] Theatre Experience Week (tour) [12 August 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973] The Chocolate Frog / The Old Familiar Juice (La Boite) [18 June 1973] White with Wire Wheels (La Boite) [4 June 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Juno and the Paycock (SGIO) [29 March 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] A Masque in Honour of the City of Brisbane (SGIO) [29 September 1972] The Ruling Class (SGIO) [11 August 1972] Twelfth Night (SGIO) [14 July 1972] The Schoolmistress (SGIO) [16 June 1972] Assault with a Deadly Weapon (SGIO) [7 April 1972] Lock Up Your Daughters (SGIO) [10 March 1972] Puss in Boots (SGIO) [1972] The Legend of King O’Malley (SGIO) [29 December 1971] The Wind in the Sassafras Trees (SGIO) [10 September 1971] Burke’s Company (SGIO) [13 August 1971] She Stoops to Conquer (SGIO) [16 July 1971] The Associates (SGIO) [5 June 1971] The Ghost Train (SGIO) [8 May 1971] Hadrian VII (SGIO) [10 April 1971] Oh What a Lovely War (SGIO) [12 March 1971] The Wrong Side Of The Moon (SGIO) [1971] Wait Until Dark (SGIO) [23 September 1970] Philadephia Here I Come (SGIO) [3 July 1970] A Rum Do! (SGIO) [10 April 1970]

credits on AusStage AusStage #254572Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Gwen WheelerGwen Wheeler

in memoriam

Actor

Gwendolyn Wheeler began her acting career at Queensland University from which she graduated with first class honors in English language and literature. She has played many leading roles with the Brisbane Repertory Theatre and Twelfth Night in such plays as The Crucible, The Way Of The World, The Visit, The One Day of The Year, The Matchmaker, Three Sisters and Summer and Smoke. A long time radio actress with the ABC, Gwen was a beloved onstage fixture of the QTC company for many productions.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Front Page (SGIO) [9 November 1982] The Warhorse (SGIO) [27 April 1982] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Mourning Becomes Electra (SGIO) [8 August 1980] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Man Who Came to Dinner (SGIO) [31 October 1979] A Streetcar Named Desire (SGIO) [11 July 1979]

credits on AusStage AusStage #257269
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm6790877/Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Stephen WhittakerStephen Whittaker

Actor

After a successful career with the QTC, Stephen left Queensland to pursue fame in the land down under stumbling from the Sydney Theatre Company to the Melbourne Theatre Company and ending up in TV where as his IMDB credits attest, he was was in virtually anything that was made during the 90’s and early 2000’s. Australian TV credits include Blue HeelersGood Vibrations to the salacious Chances and Neighbours. In New Zealand TV, Jacksons Wharf along with various US TV series made on the cheap in the Australasian region,  Movies included Hard Word and the cult film Houseboat Horror, Stephen was also in Geoffrey Rush’s first foray on the screen in Mercury for the ABC.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Family Room (Cremorne) [8 October 1985] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Salonika (Cremorne) [2 July 1985] Cheapside (Cremorne) [19 May 1985] Three Sisters (SGIO) [12 March 1985] The Real Thing (SGIO) [12 February 1985] In Duty Bound (SGIO) [27 November 1984] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] The Trial of Brer Rabbit (SGIO) [5 December 1983]

credits on AusStage AusStage #4406
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm1072455/Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who David WilliamsonDavid Williamson AO

Playwright

David Keith Williamson was born in Melbourne, Victoria on 24 February 1942 and was brought up in Bairnsdale. He graduated from Monash University with a Bachelor of Engineering degree in 1965. His early forays into the theatre were as an actor and writer with his first play, The Indecent Exposure of Anthony East, produced by the Tin Alley Players at Melbourne University’s Union Theatre in 1968, and as a satirical sketch writer for Monash University student reviews and the Emerald Hill Theatre Company. David first turned to writing and performing in plays in 1967 with La Mama Theatre Company and The Pram Factory, and rose to prominence in the early 1970s, with works such as Don’s Party (later turned into a 1976 film) and The Removalists (1971). He collaborated on the screenplays for Gallipoli (1981) and The Year of Living Dangerously (1982). Williamson’s work as a playwright focuses on themes of politics, loyalty and family in contemporary urban Australia, particularly in two of its major cities, Melbourne and Sydney. His prolific output far exceeds that of any other contemporary Australian dramatist, and his commercial success in unmatched. His plays include: Jugglers Three (1972), What If You Died Tomorrow? (1973), The Department (1975), A Handful of Friends (1976), The Club (1977), After the Ball (1977), Travelling North (1979), Celluloid Heroes (1980), The Perfectionist (1982), Sons of Cain (1985), Emerald City (1987), Top Silk (1989), Siren (1990), Money and Friends (1991), Brilliant Lies (1993), Sanctuary (1994), Dead White Males (1995), Heretic (1996), Third World Blues (1997 – an adaptation of Jugglers Three), Corporate Vibes (1999), Face to Face (1999), The Great Man (2000), Up for Grabs (2001), A Conversation (2001), Charitable Intent (2001), Soulmates (2002), Amigos (2004), Influence (2005). In 2005 Williamson announced his retirement from main stage productions. He ‘retired’ to Noosa, Queensland where, in 1991, he and his wife, writer Kristin Williamson, were instrumental in founding the annual Noosa Longweekend cultural festival. He and Kristin were in the cast of his play Charitable Intent, which had its premiere in the 2002 festival. Flatfoot premiered there in 2003, Birthrights in 2004, Operatorin 2005, and Strings Under My Fingers in 2006. Forgetting his ‘retirement’, Williamson has continued to write for the stage – plays including Up for Grabs (2006), Lotte’s Gift (2007), Scarlett O’Hara at the Crimson Parrot (2008), Let the Sunshine (2009), and At Any Cost? and Nothing Personal (2011). In the Australia Day 1983 Honours List he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for service to the arts as a playwright and screen writer.

Selected highlights of credits include: Emerald City (Suncorp) [24 March 1987] Sons of Cain (Suncorp) [8 April 1986] The Perfectionist (SGIO) [12 April 1983] Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] The Removalists (SGIO) [16 July 1975]

https://DavidWilliamsonPlaywright.com
credits on AusStage AusStage #2
credits DB icon LPA LivePerformance/David-Williamson
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm0932011/
Order of Australia Australian Honours #870154Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Kate WilsonKate Wilson

(aka Kathryn Wilson aka Kate Foy)
Actor & Writer

Kate, actor and arts educator who has worked in education since the mid 1960s as a classroom teacher and the performing arts since 1972. For QTC she appeared in over 3 dozen productions and has also written, directed, and taught for the Company. Kate has directed and worked as an actor with the New England Theatre Company and appeared in several plays during the 1970s for Twelfth Night Theatre. Kate has served as a judge for the Queensland Premier’s Drama Award, and maintains a dramaturgical consultancy as part of her private practice. She is also on the Matilda Awards Judging Panel (2019-2021). As an educator, she uses her married name to honour the support her late husband, Murray Foy gave her during the time she was engaged in study and research for her PhD at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Murray died before she completed her dissertation but she dedicated it to him and used her married name as author and in her capacity as an Associate Professor and arts advocate. At the University of Southern Queensland Kate held the positions of Head of Department, Director USQ Performance Centre, and Deputy Dean, and has also served on the USQ Council. On leaving the university, Kate was recognised as an Honorary Professor by USQ. She maintains a private coaching practice, and is an Associate Professor and sessional staff member Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University in the Performing Arts Department. In 2020, Kate was honoured by the Actors Benevolent Fund (Queensland) with the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Performing Arts in Queensland as an Actor, Teacher and Mentor.

Selected highlights of credits include: Travelling North (SGIO) [4 July 1980] Confusions (SGIO) [23 November 1977] Otherwise Engaged (SGIO) [26 October 1977] Saint Joan (SGIO) [20 July 1977] The Merchant of Venice (SGIO) [13 April 1977] Hobson’s Choice (SGIO) [16 March 1977] A Toast To Melba (SGIO) [15 September 1976] The Department (SGIO) [18 August 1976] Savages (SGIO) [21 July 1976] Fourth of July (SGIO) [4 July 1976] The School for Scandal (SGIO) [26 May 1976] Tuff (Tour) [May 1976] Egg Froth the Frithed (Tour) [February 1976] Equus (SGIO) [20 November 1975] The Maiden at the Gate (Tour) [October 1975] The Carrot and the Munchy Monster (Tour) [October 1975] The Owl and the Pussycat Went to See… (SGIO) [26 December 1974] A Doll’s House (SGIO) [21 November 1974] The Rainmaker (Tour) [1975] Present Laughter (SGIO) [19 September 1974] Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (SGIO) [22 August 1974] The Philanthropist (SGIO) [25 July 1974] The Rivals (SGIO) [27 June 1974] Godspell (SGIO) [2 May 1974] Death of a Salesman (SGIO) [21 March 1974] Aladdin (SGIO) [27 December 1973] Suddenly at Home (SGIO) [29 November 1973] Old Times (SGIO) [30 August 1973] The Imaginary Invalid (SGIO) [2 August 1973] Pygmalion (SGIO) [5 July 1973] The National Health or Nurse Norton’s Affair (SGIO) [26 April 1973] Expresso Bongo (SGIO) [1 March 1973] Mr Punch (Tour) [1973] The Badly Behaved Bunyip (Tour) [31 May 1972] The Man, the Spirit Fish and the Rainbow Snake (Tour) [31 May 1972]

https://KateFoy.com

credits on AusStage AusStage #255089Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Leo WocknerLeo Wockner

Actor

Leo Wockner and the Queensland Theatre Company’s have been married since the very first QTC show in 1969. Leo’s other theatre credits include productions for La Boite Theatre Company, and others. Leo has also had numerous roles in film and TV such as Silent Reach (1983), The Mango Tree (1977) and Death Games (1980) and episodes of Meatheads, Butterfly Island and The Little Fella. He was awarded the Centenary Medal in the 2001 Queen’s New Years Honours List for his services to the performing arts in Queensland. Leo won a Matilda Award in 2002 for his contribution to the arts, and also in 2002 Leo was recipient of the Alan Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award as an Actor and Union Activist. In 2006 he was awarded a MEAA Gold Honour Badge foe meritorious service.

Selected highlights of credits include: The Merry Wives of Windsor (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [29 September 1987] Arms and the Man (Suncorp) [9 June 1987] Macbeth (Suncorp) [3 September 1985] Henry V (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1984] Godsend (SGIO) [7 August 1984] Love for Love (SGIO) [29 May 1984] Much Ado About Nothing (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [13 September 1983] The Life of Galileo (SGIO) [24 May 1983] As You Like It (Albert Park Amphitheatre) [25 September 1981] The Seagull (SGIO) [17 July 1981] No Names … No Pack Drill (SGIO) [12 June 1981] Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (SGIO) [27 March 1981] Richard III (SGIO) [23 May 1980] The Playboy of the Western World (SGIO) [18 April 1980] The Aussie Battler Show (Tour) [1978] And the Big Men Fly (SGIO) [24 November 1976] The Royal Hunt of the Sun (SGIO) [1 October 1969]

credits on AusStage AusStage #3355
credits imdb IMDB.com/nm0937282/
Order of Australia Australian Honours #1119189Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

QTC Whos Who Magda WollnerMagda Wollner

in memoriam

Queensland Theatre Company Guild Chairwoman

From 1969, restaurateur Magda Wollner ran “Two Seasons”, a fashionable eatery in downtown Brisbane. In the late 1970’s, Magda established the Queensland Theatre Company Guild, a large, well organized group of society connected volunteers working closely with Lewis Savage to develop and maintain subscribers, increasing ongoing ticketing revenue for the company with some estimates as high as 30%.Top of Australian Theatre Hall of Fame Page

Without this company of artists, technicians, craftsman, administrators, managers and creatives leading the way, Australian theatre would be very different today. As Douglas Hedge’s 10th Anniversary book was aptly titled, it’s THE COMPANY WE KEEP.

~1,000 thespians worked for the
Queensland Theatre Company
from 1969 until the late 1980’s

PERFORMERS: Grant Adams Peter Adams Kerrie Adams Stephen Agnew Jeff Ahern Bill Aitken Mark Albiston Elizabeth Alexander Robert Alexander John Allen Marilyn Allen Doug Anders Judith Anderson Justine Anderson Owen Anderson Bryan Andrews Narelle Arcidiacono Victoria Arthur Robert Arthur  Victor Ashelford  Les Asmussen John Atha Paul Atthow Jenny Austen Bill Austin Terry Bader Helmut Bakaitis Phyllis Ball Vincent Ball Janis Balodis Janis Balodis Peter Barley Ray Barrett Brian Barrie Charles Barry Douglas Barry Megan Bartlett Don Batchelor Mark Battershill Jonathon Baxter John Bayliss Anne Bazeley Roger Beames Danica Beckett Patricia Bein Bernadette Bein Kathryn Bein Randall Berger Stephen Bergin Diane Berryman Kathy Bertram Zoe Bertram Chris Betts Allen Bickford Pat Bishop Paul Bishop Alexandra Black Wendy Blacklock Brian Blain Leila Blake Lesley Blanning Jennifer Blocksidge Lindy Bloor Michael Boddy Peter Bodnar Lisa Bolte Elaine Bolton Cornelis Boogaart Allan Booth Andrew Booth Helen Booth John Bowman Terry Brady Sheila Bradley Simon Bray Jacquie Brennan Bille Brown AM  Noeline Brown OAM Olivia Brown David Brown Larry Brown Judy Brown-Beresford Graham Bruce Joan Bruce Maria Buckler Craig Burgess Rhonda Burchmore Marcella Burgoyne William Burke   Tom Burlinson Cathy Burnett Carol Burns Deanne Burns Glen Burns Petah Burns Vicki Burns Laurel Burton Simon Burvill-Holmes Chryss Cahill Shane Calcutt Reginald Cameron OAM Sally Camm Bradley Campbell Duncan Campbell Merrin Canning Justin Cannock Brian Cannon Tony Carew Mal Carmont Kerrianne Carr Melvin Carroll Geoff Cartwright Lynnette Cassells Jenny Castle Ron Challinor  Gessi Cavassa Melissa Cheers Alistair Cheyne Peter Chenoweth Diane Cilento Tricia Circosta Janine Claire Jennifer Claire Liddy Clark Peter Clarke Stephen Clark John Clayton Eileen Clelland David Clendinning Stu Cochrane Rona Coleman Paul Collings Peter Collingwood John Collingwood-Smith John Collins Warwick Comber Warwick Comber Athol Compton Judi Connelli Michael Coogan Rosetta Cook Jan Cooper Cynthia Cooper Malcolm Cork Peter Cottrell Adam Couper Peter Cousens AM  Brian Cox Kevin Cox Roger Cox Suean Cox John Craig Andrew Cromption Rachel Crompton Karen Crone Don Crosby Brian Crossley Claire Crowther Pauline Cuffe Max Cullen Lynette Curran Elaine Cusick Alan Dale Jane Daley Rouna Daley Ross Daniels Peter Darch Vivien Davies Robert Davis Paul Dawber Susan Day Paul Dellit OAM Carmel Dennis Danelle Denny Jane Denver Leon Devine Janet Devlin James Dickson John Diedrich Arthur Dignam Grant Dodwell Garry Doherty Don Doherty John Dommett Paul Donald Natalie Doorey Kathleen Dorahy Barry Douglas John Dovey Nigel Drews Alan Dukes Roslyn Dunbar Rod Dunbar Carmen Duncan Susan Dunn Raymond Duparc Sue Dwyer Christine Dwyer Ian Dyson Nicholas Eadie Alan Edwards AM MBE Robert Eastgate John Eastman Mark Eckleston Mark Eckersley Dianne Eden James Elliott Les Evans Peter Everett Jon Ewing Howard Eynon Anna Farnworth Barbara Farrell Susan Fauvel Barbara Fawcett Michele Fawdon James Fels Gavan Fenelon Willie Fennell Noel Ferrier AM Michael Ferguson Jennifer Fern Wayne Findlay Ron Finney Judith Fisher John Fitzpatrick Kate Fitzpatrick Neil Fitzpatrick Rosalie Fletcher Rosalie Fletcher Jennifer Flowers Terry Fogarty Matt Foley Kym Ford Steven Ford Margery Forde Michael Forde Ross Forsyth Billy Forsythe  Richard Fotheringham AM Noel Fox Murray Foy Arthur Frame AM  Kerry Francis Gavin Fraser Kimlarn Frecker Kimlarn Michael Freeland Bill French Susie French Debbie Fulloon Hilary Furlong Michael Futcher Ben Gabriel Nathy Gaffney Frank Gallacher  Paul Galbraith Frank Garfield Jane Gelhaar Gregory Gesch Shaun Gibbons Vikki Gibson-Miller Isobel Gidley Noel Gilbert Reginald Gillam Eugene Gilfedder Monica Gilfedder Tony Girdler Gordon Glenwright Richard Glover Catherine Glynn Margaret Glynn David Goddard Janet Goldsmith Ron Graham Vivean Gray Trevor Green Jennifer de Greenlaw John Gregg Jo-Ann Greig Elise Greig Peter Grose Ray Gurney Robyn Gurney Ron Hackett Stephen Haddan Ron Haddrick AM MBE Bryan Hain Jacqui Hall Jenny Hall Chris Hallam Neil Hallam Peter Hanlon John Hannan Pamela Hanson Danae Harbottle Tereska Harbottle Dian Harbulot Jane Harders Veronica Harding Catheryn Harker Martin Harris Terry Hartung Allen Harvey Graham Harvey Robin Harvey Robyn Harvey Trevor Harward Daniel Havas Anthony Hawkins Louise Hayes Russell Heading Douglas Hedge Mark Hembrow Annie Henderson Stephen Henderson John Heywood Kevin Hicks Kevin Hides  Keely Hocking Noel Hodda Laurence Hodge Norman Hodges Dudley Hogarth Janet Hollingworth Lorna Holloway  Patricia Holmes Ross Honeywell Katy Hopkins Bob Hornery Rodney Horton Sally Horton-Perry Paul Hourigan Kathryn Houston Carolyn Howard Kevin Howard Edward Howell  Hazel Howson Jade Huckins Jade Huckins  Jan Huggett  Tim Hughes Darryl Hukins Ronald Hunt Gillian Hyde Rob Inglis Wilson Irving Kevin Jackson Joe James Brian James Curt Jansen John Jarratt Anna Jeppesen Peter Johnson Dale Johnston Ross Johnston Johnny Johnstone Alida Rae Jones Lewis Jones Margery Jones Patricia Jones Timothy Jones Colleen Jong Peter Jordan James Kable Ivar Kants Jacki Kay Jacqueline Kay Robert Keane Mel Keenan Fay Kelton Kay Kelton Stuart Kemp Stuart Kemp Laura Keneally Patricia Kennedy Ken Kennett OAM Trevor Kent Steve Kenyon Russell Kiefel Jonathon King Lloyd King Robert Kingham Jacinta Kinnane John Krummel OAM Peter Knapman Penny Knox Katina Komino Peter Kowitz Colin Kratzing Bruce Kronberger Peter Lamb Toni Lamond AM Graham Lancaster Allan Lander Kerry-Anne Langenbaker Nicholas Langton Christopher Latham Peter Lavery Ron Layne Alan David Lee Elaine Lee Heidi Lee Lyn Lee Mark Lee Robyn Leggett Valerie Lehman Ian Leigh-Cooper David Leith Dirk Leonard Jan Levi Bettina Lewers Bernard Lewis Susie Lindeman Glenda Linscott Charles Little Davidson Little Alfred Lizzio Barbara Llewellyn John Llewellyn Andrew Lloyde Frank Lloyd Margot Lloyd Mark Lloyd Hunt Victoria Longley Melissa Lovejoy Barry Lovett Alayne Lowein Barbara Lowing Brian Lucas Betty Lucas Susan Lyons Donald MacDonald Robert van Mackelenberg Donald Macleod Andrew McFarlane Vanessa Mafe Gerard Maguire Janet Mahoney Scott Maidment Frank Malet Tracy Mann Robert Manning Paul Marriott Berys Marsh Peter Marshall Andrew Martin Sharonlee Martin Ingrid Mason-Chan Yvonne Mathew Leanne Mauchlin Monica Maughan Chris Maver Tony Maw Michael McCaffrey Rikki McDonald Gordon McDougall Kay McFeeter Scott McGeever Anthony McGill Alethea McGrath Scott McGregor Siobhan McGregor Kerry McGuire Kerry McKay Janine McKee Rohan McKenna Sally McKenzie Sarah McKenzie Geoff McLean Katie McNeil Geoffrey McSkimming Bill McStay Don McTaggart Warren Meacham Ray Meagher Sean Mee Robert Menzies Gus Mercurio Peter Merrill Geoff Metcalf Keith Michell Hilary Miller Heather Mitchell Warren Mitchell Richard Moir Brian Moll Andrew Molock Margaret Moore Sharon Moore Lyn Moorfoot Peter Morris Geraldene Morrow Helen Morse Elizabeth Mortison Rebecca Morton Phil Moye Amanda Muggleton Rosalind Muir-Smith Jeremy Muir-Smith Gail Muller Tim Mullooly Hugh Munro Dale Murison Daniel Murphy Fiona Murphy David Napier John Nash Phillip Nash Dr Bryan Nason AM Veronica Neave Denise Nenke Maggie Nevins Roger Newcombe Russell Newman Jennifer Nixon Peter Noble Kirrily Nolan Maggie Noonan John Norman Pamela Norman Lindsay Norris Judy Nunn Christine O’Connor Di O’Connor Sean O’Connors Christen O’Leary Errol O’Neill Barry O’Sullivan Matthew O’Sullivan Gina Ogilvie Barry Otto Denise Otto Mark Owen-Taylor Louise Pajo John Paramor Bruce Parr Sandra Lee Patterson Bill Pengelly Dale Pengelly Mark Penman Roslyn Pennell Kay Perry Anthony Phelan Bill Phillips Bruna Phillips Hazel Phillips OAM Patrick Phillips Ross Philp Rod Pianegonda Anna Pike Geoff Pittam Brian Plumb Gaye Poole James Porter Jim Porter Terence Porter Lynne Porteous Christopher Pozzi Beth Prescott Stephen Preston Brent Purdy Robin Ramsay Peter Raymond-Powell Martin Redpath Wayne Rees Yvette Rees Krista Reeves John Remess Timothy Reuther Lance Reynolds Nigel Rice Antony Richards Kate Richter Marcia Rickertt Rosemary Ricketts Sue Rider Rebecca Riggs Sean Riordan Sally Robertson Sue Robinson Joyce Rogers Des Rolfe Michael Rolfe Betty Ross Stephen Ross Bill Rough Sue Rowe Anne Roylance Suzanne Roylance Deidre Rubenstein Greg Rudd Geoffrey Rush AC John Rush Louise Rush Larry Ryan David Ryan Zameel Saba Zoe Salmon June Salter AM John Saltzer David Sandford Mary-Jane Saunders Richard Scholes Colin Schumacher Peter Schwarz Lyn Semmler Harry Scott Barry Searle Jenny Seedsman Ron Shand Bev Shean Anthony Shearsmith Kate Sheil Tony Sheldon Gillian Shergold Paul Sherman Roch Shipton Tony Short Jon Sidney Toby Simkin Meg Simpson Carole Skinner David Slingsby Diane Smith Trevor Smith Gwen Soares Walt Sofronoff Paul Sonkkila Julian St. John Michael Stanford John Stanton Michele Stayner Peter Steer  Babette Stephens AM MBE Barbara Stephens Lisa Stevens Kaye Stevenson Mary-Lou Stewart Darien Sticklen David Stockwell Peter Stokes Dianne Storer Diane Storer Lance Strauss Lisa-Jane Stockwell Rosanne Stower Stewart Stubbs Justin Stuhmcke Paul Sugars  Ric Summers Inara Svalbe   Tracey Tainsh Brian Tait Eddie Talbot Steven Tandy Kit Taylor Sally Taylor Rex Taylor-Craig Genevieve Thackwell-James Stephen Thomas Caroline Thompson Nadia Thompson Elizabeth Thompson Ian Thomson Pat Thomson Russell Thomson Frank Thring Tony Thurbon Maree Timchur Alan Tobin Robyn Torney Rosemary Traynor  Lyn Treadgold Ruth Turnell Geraldine Turner OAM Rory Vanery Alison Venning Brent Verdon Peter Vickery Anna Volska Michael Wade Terry Walduck Peggy Wallach Janet Walsh Susan Walsh Susan Walsh James Wardlaw Duncan Wass Joshua Wass Peter Wass Phyllis Wass David Waters Gail Watson Graham Webster Jack Webster Owen Weingott Gaynor Wensley Angela West Julie West Benita Whalley Gwen Wheeler Denis White Michelle White Timothy Whitehill David Whitford Peter Whitford Stephen Whittaker Eric Wickham Susan Wilkinson Huw Williams Kate Wilson Alan Wilson Tracey Wilson Paul Wilstead Peter Windsor Rod Wissler Shane Withington Leo Wockner Don Wood John Wood Jackie Woodburne Judith Woodroffe Paul Woods Deborah Wray Allen Wright Lynne Wright Alan Wylie Barbara Wyndon

DIRECTORS: Helmut Bakaitis Don Batchelor John Bell Rick Billinghurst Ron Blair Ken Boucher Christine Campbell Robert Chuter Richard Cottrell Ted Craig Rex Cramphorn Peter Duncan Alan Edwards AM MBE Amanda Field Rodney Fisher AM Richard Fotheringham Murray Foy  Arthur Frame AM Frank Gallacher Gregory Gesch Mary Hickson John Hoenig Simon Hopkinson Marcus Hughes Robert Kingham John Krummel OAM Robin Lovejoy OBE Babs McMillan Joe MacColum  Aubrey Mellor OAM Dr Bryan Nason AM Lloyd Nickson John Noble Terence O’Connell Mark Radvan Sue Rider Michael Rodger Mick Rodger Anne Roylance Geoffrey Rush AC Inara Svalbe John Tasker  John Thompson Lyn Treadgold Duncan Wass

DESIGNERS: John Anderson Bruce Auld Mike Bridges  Andrew Carter Greg Clarke Timothy Clark Dr Peter Cooke AM Stephen Curtis William Dowd Paul Edwards Gregory Gesch Stephen Gow Shaun Gurton Jann Harris Silver Harris Bill Haycock John Heywood Beverley Hill Lorraine Hillard Beverley Ann Jansen Richard Jeziorny Edie Kurzer Lindsay Megarrity Graham Maclean Jamie Maclean Robby Nason Gillian Page-Lee Peter Penwarn James Ridewood Fiona Reilly John Senczuk Cliff Simcox Alan Stewart Neil Tapner Lesley Thelander Tony Tripp Randy Vellacott Kate Wall Stephen Gow (Design Assistant) Bill Shannon (Design Assistant) Duncan Wass (Design Drafting)

CHOREOGRAPHERSJudith Anderson Paul Atthow Keith Bain Pamela Buckman Harold Collins MBE Karen Crone  Annette Downs Hugh Munro Beverley Nevin Maggi Sietsma Inara Svalbe Natalie Weir Ton Witzel  Roma Egan (Ballet Mistress)

WRITERS: Michael Boddy  Richard Fotheringham  Arthur Frame AM Warren Meacham Paul Sherman David Williamson AO Kate Wilson

COMPOSERS: Linda Aronson Faye Bendrups Anthony Bowles Colin Brumby Jim Cotter George Dreyfus Eugene Gilfedder Larry Grossman Alan Lawrence Richard Peaslee Andrew Schultz Peter Sculthorpe David Shire Robin Wood Robert Keane Joe Wolfe  Raymond Cray (orchestrator)

MUSICAL DIRECTORS: Adam Couper Robert Boughen Peter Casey John Curro Eugene Gilfedder Ronald Hamner  Robert Keane George Lawrence Anthony McGill Max Olding Dale Ringland John Rodgers Brian Stacey Michael Wheelan

MUSICIANS: Antoni Bonetti Stephen Brockman Charles Bromley Liddy Clark Tom Coyle Martin Crook Peter Dart Robert Davidson Peter Done Lachlan Easton Colin Fox Janine Grantham Katie Harrison John Helman Malcolm Liddell Donald MacDonald ★ Simon Overt Paul Pallister Ken Poggioli Tom Pommerel Geoff Proud John Richard Philip Robertson Maria Sillams Ross Smith Deborah Stong Olgs Thorpe Garry Williams Chen Yang

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT: Don Batchelor Alan Colegrave Arthur Frame AM ★ Dennis Law ★ Graeme McCoubrie John Watson  (Production Managers) Jane Murray Norma Knight (Tour Managers)  Vicki Birch Yvette (Capt) O’Brien (Production Secretary)

STAGE MANAGEMENT: Vito Arena  Victor Ashelford  Paul Atthow ★ Brian Barnes Bruce Bolton Sandy Bowman Russell Boyd Gary Cameron Margaret Crompton  Louise Cullinan  Annette Downs  Lindsay Fairman Steven Ford Trevlyn Gilmour  David Gration Richard (Rick) Harrison Cathy Healy  Jamie Henson Libby Higgin Louise Hucks Sussanne Humphries Ben Jansen Glenda Johnson  Timothy Jones  Ellen Kennedy  Kathyrn Lloyd  Mark Lloyd Hunt Owen MacDonald Richard Mackay-Sollay Caroline Mackie Kim Mahler  David McCrudden Barry Melville Kit Oldfield Rowan Pryor  Peter Reeve Kristin Reuter Judy Robb Toby Simkin David Spiller Rodney Therkelsen Scott Thiele Patrick Whelan Jullianne White Colin Wilson

WARDROBE: Patricia Allen Cynthia Bowen  Danny Healy Jay Mansfield-Askew Gayle MacGregor  Marie Perry-Watson Nelda Strydom (Supervisors) Heather Brown Kenn Bushby Byron Clayton Thelma Cope Sarah Elizabeth Meredith Fogg Jo Forsyth Marianne Frederiksen Jo Hardie Jane Harrison Lesa Hepburn Caroline Hullock Jenny Kants Karen Litzow  Anne Long Robyn Martin Pamela Martin Arlie McGill Heather Noble Margaret Reeves Kate Vosiliunas Terry Walduck Lexie Wright Kerry Yates (Costumers)  Dawn Grieg (Wardrobe Hire)

PROPERTIES: Gary Cameron Kevin McLean David Palm Paul Parkinson  James Pearce Kristin Reuter Michael Schroeder Mike Wormald Darryl McLoughlin

CARPENTRY: Howard Steele David Tanner (Head Carpenter)  Des Dougan Fred Driver Stan Fritsch Allan Maguire Peter Sands David Tanner Gary Vaughan-Wilson Peter Vosiliunas (Carpenters)  Cornelis Boogaart  Alan Maguire (Apprentice Carpenter)  Caroline Gyucha Paul Marriott Kathleen O’Brian (Scenic Artists)

LIGHTING: Victor Ashelford John Beckett Donn Byrnes Pam Collings Tony Everingham Jamie Henson Nigel Levings Graeme McCoubrie David McCrudden Kenneth Rayner David Read Peter Shoesmith Geoff Street  Stephen Terry Paddy Teuma David Walters John Watson  David Whitworth Tony Youlden (Lighting Designers) Les Alberts Peter Baynes Bernadette Cochrane David Lees David Malacari Christine Platzer Murray Wright (Lighting Operators)

SOUND: Bruce Ames Kevin Davidson David Gurney Peter Freeman Toby Simkin Ian Stevenson

SPECIALTY CONSULTANTSChris Betts  John Humphreys (Fight Direction) Jan Huggett (Make up Artist)  David Laird  Geraldine Owens Toby Simkin (Animal Wrangler) Richard Scholes Ton Witsel (Mime Consultants) Barry Cannon (Circus Consultant)

EDUCATION: Murray Foy  Arthur Frame AM Lloyd Nickson (Education Officer)

STAFF: June Craw OAM (Finance & Business Officer) Gillian Coar (Executive Officer)  Lewis Savage (Subscriptions & Ticketing)  Ken Kennett OAM Christine Walsh (Public Relations & Publicity Officer) Bart Hosking Jim Martin Peter Maclean (Publicists) Richard Magnus (Fundraising Chairman) Yolande Bird  Yvonne Aitken Jan Annesley Susan Brazier Amanda Collins Mary Dooley Janet Hayes Brian Horton Diane Leith  Ron Litchfield (Administrators)  Helen Mayes (Clerical Assistant)  Jan Annesley  Susan Bonning Jennie Lewis Toby Simkin (Receptionists) Diana Franklin (London Representatives)  Michael Menzies (New York Representative) Ivan/Gloria Pierce Derrick George (Photographers)

S.G.I.O. THEATRE: Jim Wright (Manager)  Alban Riley Don Fergusson (Assistant Managers) Dallas Black  Kay Fifas (Booking Office)  Geoffrey Bielefeld Ray Calcutt Ken Clarke Mark Gover Petar Petrovich (Head Mechanists) Elaine Acworth Bruce Barker David Hobbs Tony Maher (Mechanists)  Derek Campbell David Malacari  Max Shayler Patrick (Paddy) Teuma Ian Tinney (Head Electricians)

ALBERT PARK THEATRE: Wayne McKenna (House Manager)  Margo Morris (Box Office)

QTC GUILD: Magda Wollner (Chairwoman) Alice Beacroft Joan Chamberlain Bobbie Glyn Evans Maureen Fallon Sonja Farmer Beryl Foote Neil Fulwood Dolores Garland Elaine Heath Edna Heathwood Margaret Hill Ena Huppert June Jamieson Eva Klug Irene Lefman Patrick Mellick Hillary Mosten